Tag Archives: woff

Buyer’s Guide: Self-Hosted vs. Hosted Web Fonts

Webfonts are here to stay, but there seems to be some confusion on how webfonts are licensed and implemented on a site. You have two basic options, Hosted or Self-Hosted. Below are some basic things to know.

Web_Host

Self-Hosted webfonts from FontShop

  • You are charged based on the number of pageviews per month your site has as a one-time fee.
  • You are given the EOT/WOFF files to self-host on your site.
  • You keep track of the pageviews per month your site receives.
  • You can extend your license to support more pageviews by contacting FontShop.

Hosted webfonts from service providers

  • You are charged based on the number of pageviews per month your site has as a subscription based model which can be annual/monthly depending on the provider.
  • You are given a line of code to include within your site that serves the fonts to your site.
  • The service provider keeps track of the pageviews per month your site receives.
  • If you go over your pageview limit, default fonts may be served until you increase your subscription terms.

Self-Hosted and Hosted

*FF Chartwell Web is currently not supported.

Buyer’s Guide: What formats are webfonts available in?

webfontformats2Typically, webfonts are available in EOT and WOFF formats — if you don’t know what these formats are, you can check out our What is EOT and WOFF? post.

FontShop‘s webfont selection is limited to the formats that the foundries supply and is not available in TTF or SVG formats. Under many of the foundries’ licensing terms, converting fonts to other formats for web use is not allowed. Always double-check a foundry’s End User License Agreement to be sure what is and isn’t allowed.

Buyer’s Guide: Can I install EOT or WOFF on my computer?

When you’re searching for fonts on FontShop, sometimes you’ll see webfonts in your search results. For example, if you search for “FF DIN” only, “FF DIN Web” may come up down the list, too:

buyersguide-eotwoff2

Keep in mind that desktop fonts and webfonts are not the same! Desktop licensing and web licensing are completely separate, so if you’re planning on using something like FF DIN for a big project that includes print materials and a shiny new website, you’ll need to license both the desktop version (OpenType or TrueType format) and the web version (EOT and WOFF formats).

buyersguide-eotwoffIf you have only purchased a webfont, you will not be able to install the webfonts on your computer. Webfont formats — EOT and WOFF — cannot be installed on Macs or PCs. A webfont will not work in desktop programs like InDesign or Microsoft Word.

If you need a version to install on your computer for mockups or wireframes (in Photoshop or Illustrator, for example), you can use our Plugin to test out fonts in Adobe® Creative Suite® — it’s free and easy to use!

Buyer’s Guide: How to buy a Webfont

We’re rounding up previous guides to help you demystify licensing webfonts on FontShop.

Need help finding webfonts on our site?

Read am I buying a webfont?

Confused about what webfont formats are and how to use them?

Then check out what is EOT or WOFF.

Don’t know the difference between a desktop license and a webfont license?

Read up  on how our webfonts are licensed.

Do you have a Typekit account and you want to link your webfonts to your account?

Then find out if your webfont can be linked to Typekit.

FontShop Friday Five: Growing Galleries & Hidden Glyphs

We know you’re busy and the Internet is a crowded place, so we’ll try to give you a little reminder on Fridays of what’s going on out there. Below please find five recent FontShop-related threads that you may have missed.

Hey there Fontspotters!

Did you know you can help grow the FontShop gallery? Check out how here.

A Different Kind of Font Face

We’re loving the hidden glyphs in designer Łukasz Dziedzic‘s creations.

Stylish On Screen and Off

In last week’s Webfont Wednesday we reviewed the The Chicago Manual of Style Online  and this week we take a look at the equally gorgeous print edition, using FF Tisa.

Speaking of Books…

This week’s Webfont Wednesday examines Designers & Books‘ use of FF Bau Web.

On The Font Feed

Yves Peters tackles the many disappointing summer blockbuster posters, and the few hidden gems, in this month’s Screen Fonts.

Friday Five Fonts: Penna by DSType and Altis by Typolar

Webfont Wednesday: I Love Web FontFonts

This has certainly been an exciting week in Webfonts here at FontShop. Not only did we we get giddy at the WOFF support announcement for Lion, but we also rode the buzz around Azuro Web into the final hours of its 90% off promotion. The discount may be over, but you can still purchase this typeface, optimized to achieve the best possible legibility on screen.

With visions of beautifully designed websites dancing in our heads, we decided to launch a new series here on the blog called “Webfont Wednesday.” Each week we’ll highlight a site using Web FontFonts in this space. Though our staff is spotting them out in the wilds of the internet, please feel free to share your designs in the comments section, on Twitter using hashtag #WebfontWeds, or on our Facebook page.

This week we’d like to point out an I Love Typography post on the recent TYPO Berlin conference. Not only was it wonderful to read Dan Reynolds’ detailed synopsis of the presentations, but what a gorgeous presentation using FF Scala Sans Web for the headlines and the FF Scala Web for the body.

Now if i could just see those lovely webfonts in my Google Reader feed…

Safari to support WOFF in Mac OS X Lion

Steve Jobs announced a whole heckuva lot of stuff yesterday at the WWDC here in San Francisco. Between iCloud, iOS 5, and all of the new features Jobs introduced in OS X Lion, there’s a lot to be excited about.

But the most exciting feature for FontShop and its customers introduced yesterday didn’t make it into Jobs’ keynote. Hidden in this expansive feature list for Lion was this bit of gold:

Support for the Web Open Font Format (WOFF) gives web designers and developers the ability to use a wider range of fonts on websites.

What this means for us and you: soon, your Web FontFonts (as well as the recently released Azuro Web) will be supported in Safari as well as every other major browser, allowing you to comfortably host webfonts knowing that your visitors will view your website in all its typographically fine-tuned correctness.

For the uninitiated: WOFF is a file format which provides lightweight compression and the capacity for additional metadata, which can be implemented on websites using CSS @font-face rules. Developed by Jonathan Kew, Tal Leming, and Erik van Blokland, WOFF fonts are generally converted from TrueType (TTF), and can contain hinting for optimal onscreen rendering. WOFF is a recommended standard by the W3C, and is already supported in FireFox (3.6+), Chrome (6+), and Internet Explorer (9+).

Mac OS X Lion will be available in July. This gives you just enough time to browse our Web FontFont offerings and pick some new faces for your site in celebration of Safari joining the WOFF revolution.

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