Tag Archives: Wedding

Buyer’s Guide: Picking script fonts for non-design programs

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A couple weeks ago, we talked about picking scripts for design programs. This week, we’ll discuss picking the right swashy font for those who will be using them in programs like Microsoft Office or iWorks applications.

Picking scripts for non-design programs gets a little bit tricky. Microsoft Office does not handle OpenType features well — these OpenType features include the beautiful stylistic or contextual alternates available in some script typefaces that you might want to use and are discussed in our Using Type: Contextual Alternates, Ligatures post. Don’t worry: there are script fonts that are made to work in Word or Pages, if that’s what you’ll be designing your invitations or printing your envelopes from.

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For example, let’s take Feel Script and Mahogany Script. Feel Script is beautiful and a quite popular typeface for wedding collateral. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work well in Microsoft Office or Pages. If you take a look at the Character Set for Feel Script, you’ll see that this one font alone has over 1,000 glyphs:

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On the product page for Feel Script, you can view all the glyphs in the character set as well as see how many glyphs total there are. If a script font has over 1,000 glyphs, it’s safe to say that it won’t work as well in Microsoft Office or Pages. Many of the basic glyphs (such as the default uppercase and lowercase letters and default numeral set) would work in non-design programs, but if you had your eye on a beautiful curve in the Stylistic or Contextual Alternates, you’re likely to be disappointed that you can’t use or access them. Pages may be able to access some Stylistic Alternates, but it’s not guaranteed. Instead, Mahogany Script is a good alternative solution.

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Bickham Script Pro is another popular wedding typeface that does not work well in Microsoft Office programs. Fortunately, there are a lot of alternatives to use, like Helinda Rook. Let’s take a look at Helinda’s character set:

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Compared to a more complex font like Feel Script, you’ll notice that there are no Stylistic or Contextual Alternates listed and the total number of glyphs is pretty small. It’s safe to assume that a script font that has about 200 to 300 total glyphs will work just fine in Word or Pages, especially if there are no Alternates listed. You might also find that some of these fonts with smaller character sets are listed as “PC TrueType” format fonts — do note that PC TrueType fonts do work on Macs!

Also, some fonts that are usable on Word or Pages do have Alternates, but the Alternates are treated differently:

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For example, here’s Sloop. If you do want to use a font with Stylistic Alternates, some fonts are divided into separate font files. Here, you’ll see “Sloop Script One”, “Two”, and “Three”. At a glance, they all look similar, but you’ll notice that some letters have more swashes to them. Instead of treating these swashy alternates as OpenType features, they are offered as separate font files for those who use programs that can’t access OpenType features — you’ll need to install all three font files to access the alternates.

Stay tuned this week for our Using Type post on Thursday which will address accessing OpenType features in programs such as Pages or Word.

If you’re still having trouble choosing a font or something similar to a font you can’t use in Word or Pages, don’t hesitate to contact our Sales & Support team — we’ll help you find the right font for your needs!

Pinterested: I do, I do, I do

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To kick off Wedding Month on Pinterest, we created a board this week featuring beautiful wedding photos from fStop Images. This week, our I do, I do, I do pinboard features lovely bouquets and veiled brides. Follow our wedding board and stay tuned for next week’s additions: script fonts!

Buyer’s Guide: Picking script fonts for design programs

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Many of the script fonts available on FontShop have contextual alternates, stylistic alternates, or just beautiful swashes in general that would work well for wedding invitations. But how do you know which font to say “I do” to?

If you’re working in Adobe Creative Suite programs (such as InDesign, Illustrator, or Photoshop), you’re in luck. Fonts with lots of contextual and stylistic alternates work well in these programs. To get started, you can browse our Full-Featured Formal Scripts FontList. A typeface like SudtiposPoem Script Pro has many options to choose from. The uppercase “I” alone has six additional stylistic alternates — you can say “I do” in multiple ways!

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Full-featured formal scripts are fun to work with, but only if you’re using them in design programs like Adobe Creative Suite. You can read more on how to access alternates in Photoshop or Illustrator in our Using Type: Contextual Alternates, Ligatures post. If you’re designing your wedding invitations or other materials in different programs like Microsoft Office or iWorks applications, you have to be a bit more choosy. Poem Script has a total of 1,675 glyphs in its character set — some programs just can’t access all of these alternates. Stay tuned for Part 2 of picking script fonts for use in other programs.

Send Us Your Typographic Wedding Designs and Win!

This month on the blog we’ll be highlighting some of our favorite wedding designs.  We also know our talented readers have certainly come up with some fabulous ones of their own. We’d love to inspire others with your creative collateral, so we’re announcing the first of our wedding month contests for designers.

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Whether it’s invites, placecards, programs or something else skillfully using typography to highlight that special day, share examples* with us by emailing your submissions to contest@fontshop.com by Sunday, June 16 (before 11:59 p.m. Pacific). Only three submissions per designer please (if you submit more than three, only the first three chronologically will be entered). We’ll then pin them to our Pinterest page and tally votes through the number of “likes” through June 30.

The winner will be announced on Monday, July 1 and will receive $100 credit on FontShop.com.

Look forward to watching your designs walk down the aisle!

*Please note all submissions must be designed by the entrant. We reserve the right to disqualify submissions that do not meet this criteria.

Wedding Invitation Fonts & Typography

It’s Valentines Day. And on the off chance that means you’re getting married soon, we here at FontShop congratulate you and hope it’s of some service our putting together a list of recommended faces for your invitations.

Elegy by Ed Benguiat, Jim Wasco; published by ITC

It is clearly important that Americans misspell the word honor.

Novia by Cyrus Highsmith of Font Bureau

Compendium, Burgues Script by Alejandro Paul of Sudtipos

These two both interest me because of their departure from more established formal calligraphic styles in pursuit of practical 19th century penmanship.

P22 Allyson by Paul Hunt

Premiéra by Thomas Gabriel; published by Typejockeys

MVB Verdigris by Mark van Bronkhorst

Something casual; Feel Script from Sudtipos.

On getting just the right typographic feel, the work of the typographer of course extends well beyond the type selection process. If you’re a young designer, let me suggest just a few things to keep in mind starting out:

Choose an appropriate and flattering medium. Try a few different sizes of paper dummy. Package each as they’ll travel in the mail, and post them to yourself. This confronts the cost of postage from the outset. If environmental impact is chief among your concerns, consider dispensing with the interior envelope, or going with electronic only invitations.

Think about different processes and design to process. If printing letterpress from photopolymer plates for example, have someone familiar with the strengths and limitations of the process help you. Other common processes include engraving, foil stamping, thermography, letterpress printing from moveable type, lithography, and digital. If your printer quotes you a digital option, make sure you know what he or she means (usually sheetfed inkjet, but lately the term has also come to mean monochromatic or color laser).

Establish harmonious proportions. The invitation should feel good to the hand and its message clear to the eye. The size of the type, as well as the size of the margins should relate to the media that carries it. If designing in multiple sizes or styles, adhere your text to a sufficiently coarse baseline grid.

Don’t ‘brand’ this. Make it beautiful, and avoid the temptation of applying logotypes or monograms to everything. Carefully controlled, understated typography is one of the best ways of developing a consistent voice.

Do what you like. One of the things that makes a good typographer invaluable to her or his client is the ability to be arbitrary when necessary. Don’t care for this J? Try an I instead.

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