Tag Archives: webfonts

Buyer’s Guide: Font Formats

A couple weeks ago, we talked about how TrueType works with Macs — but what about the other formats, you ask? Let’s take a look at the different font formats:

OpenType, TrueType, and PostScript are the various formats that you might find fonts available in. OpenType and TrueType are compatible on both Macs and PCs while PostScript fonts are computer-specific. Webfonts come in two formats — EOT and WOFF — that you can read more about in our “What is EOT and WOFF?” post. If you’re deciding which format is the best option for you, here are some points to remember:

OpenType fonts are usually the best option, as they work on both Mac and PCs. However, not all applications are “OpenType-savvy”, so there might be some cool OpenType features like swashes and stylistic alternates that you may not be able to access if you don’t plan on using design tools such as Adobe Creative Suite programs.

TrueType fonts are a better choice if you plan on using Microsoft Office programs such as Word or Powerpoint. MS Office programs have little to no support for OpenType and tend to have issues accessing those cool swashes you want to use.

PostScript fonts are a legacy format that tend to cause issues on newer computers, which is typically why we suggest choosing OpenType or TrueType whenever possible. PostScript fonts are computer specific, meaning they will only work on either a Mac or PC, not both.

Webfonts cannot be installed on your computer but are instead used in coding for websites, typically using the @font-face CSS rule.

While browsing the fonts on FontShop, you’ll notice that they’ll have some kind of indicator of what format they’re available in, similar to the icons in the Font Format guide above.

Buyer’s Guide: How webfonts are licensed.

When you license a webfont on FontShop you obtain the right to self-host the font on your site so that visitors can view your page in a specific typeface.

A webfont license is based on the number of pageviews per month for all websites, including sub-domains, for an organization. You pay a one time fee, not a monthly or yearly fee, until the pageview rate changes. Once the pageview rate changes, you can contact FontShop to extend support for your website. If you are creating content for a client’s website then the client, not you, must license the webfont.

Catch up on our previous Buyer’s Guide to get the full scoop on webfonts here! Next week, we’ll explain what EOT/WOFF are and how to use them in your code to self-host your webfonts.

Buyer’s Guide: Can all webfonts sold on FontShop be linked to Typekit?

Currently, you can only link Web FontFonts — webfonts that begin with “FF” in their name, such as FF Meta Web or FF Suhmo Web — to your Typekit account.

Hosting with Typekit

When you purchase a Web FontFont, you will be given a voucher code that links your Web FontFonts to your Typekit account. Send your Web FontFonts to Typekit by clicking on the link given to you when your purchase is complete. When you click on this link, you should be taken to a page that should look something like this:

At this point, you will be able to double-check to make sure you are linking the correct Web FontFonts to your Typekit account. You can then sign in to your Typekit account or create a new account.

If you don’t find a yellow box with a link to send your webfonts to Typekit when you’ve completed your purchase, you can still use webfonts. Remember, Typekit is completely optional and all webfonts on FontShop can be self-hosted!

Buyer’s Guide: Am I buying a webfont?

Not all fonts on FontShop are available as webfonts. If you’re wondering whether you’re adding a webfont to your cart or not, here are a few things to look out for that will let you know you’re licensing the right kind of fonts:

1. Web Badges

When you do a general search for a font, several options may come up in the search results. Webfonts are easy to spot because they have Web Badges — a blue one in the upper right hand corner of a font listing and a gray one next to the price.

2. Font Name

Besides having badges to indicate if the font is a webfont, a webfont will have the word “Web” in its name.

3. Webfont Formats

Webfonts are usually available in two formats: WOFF and EOT. If you see anything else listed under Formats — like OT, TT, OT/TT, or PS — then you are not looking at a webfont!

4. Pricing By Pageviews

When you’re ready to checkout, there is one more way to ensure you’re licensing webfonts. Webfonts are priced based on pageviews per month, not the number of users who will be using the fonts. Instead of having to enter the number of users you need to license as you would with desktop fonts, you will need to choose a pricing tier based on the number of pageviews per month your website generates.

If you’re ready to get some webfonts, you can browse our selection of webfonts here!

Expanded Webfont Offerings at FontShop.com

In recent years, FontShop has been the place to acquire great Web FontFonts, but what about webfonts from other foundries? We’re excited to tell you that in recent weeks we’ve been adding oodles of webfonts to the catalog.

You can now find webfonts from:

You’ll notice a blue “web” icon as you browse the site.

For now only Web FontFonts purchased on FontShop can be used with Typekit. Please stay tuned to this blog for more updates and tools to help you continue to create beautiful websites.

Theresa’s Tips: Optimize Web FontFonts with Subsetter

FontFont Subsetter is free tool that allows you to optimize your licensed Web FontFonts by stripping out glyphs and data that you don’t need. All you have to do is upload your licensed Web FontFont on Subsetter, choose how you want to customize it, then download your new web font. In three easy steps you’ll have leaner file that will help make your website faster, while optimizing bandwidth usage, and reducing high-traffic cost. Try it today!

Theresa’s Tips: Hosting Web FontFonts on Typekit

FontShop makes hosting Web FontFonts on Typekit easy.

When you purchase a license from FontShop for a Web FontFont you can self host the typeface, or you can take advantage of our partnership with Typekit. It’s just a simple click on the link we provide on your check out confirmation page. If you don’t have a Typekit account, then you can set up a plan that’s right for you. Please note that only Web FontFonts can be hosted on Typekit from FontShop.

Theresa’s Tips: Web FontFont licenses and how they work.

FontShop sells three different types of licenses: Desktop, Web, and Mobile. Here are some tips to help you with your Web FontFont purchase.

A license for a Web FontFont is based on the number of pageviews a single website has in a month, lets call them “pvm” for short. Once you place a web font into your cart, you can choose to purchase a license from three tiers: 500,000 pvm, 5 million pvm, or 50 million pvm. Please note that you can always extend your license to support additional pvm or request for a quote if you need to support more than 50 million pvm by contacting us.

Web FontFonts are licensed by the average pageviews per month of all the domains within the licensing organization.

All Web FontFonts come with three font files: Comp, EOT, and WOFF. The Comp file is an TrueType-flavored OpenType font that can only be used in the design phase of  website. A separate license is needed if you need to use the Comp files for any other purpose and the use of Comp files within a website is prohibited.

You can find all the web fonts we sell here and all FontFont’s EULAs hereHere are FAQ regarding web fonts.

15 Ways to Move Your Online Brand to Mobile

Last week we introduced Mobile FontFonts, 15 type designs in 14 font packages for embedding in apps, tailored to the needs of iOS developers.

Did you know that all the faces we put out as mobile fonts are also available as webfonts? That means that you can design your mobile apps to reflect the brand you’ve created on your website, or that you can give your site a familiar feel to those who know you through your app.

So go on, get with it. We can’t wait to see what you think up next.

Mobile Font: FF Basic Gothic Mobile
Webfont: FF Basic Gothic WebMobile Font: FF Celeste Mobile
Webfont: FF Celeste Web

Mobile Font: FF Celeste Sans Mobile
Webfont: FF Celeste Sans Web

Mobile Font: FF Clifford Mobile
Webfont: FF Clifford Web

Mobile Font: FF Cocon Mobile
Webfont: FF Cocon Web

Mobile Font: FF Daxline Mobile
Webfont: FF Daxline Web

Mobile Font: FF Duper Mobile
Webfont: FF Duper Web

Mobile Font: FF Good Mobile
Webfont: FF Good WebMobile Font: FF Providence Mobile
Webfont: FF Providence Web & FF Providence Sans Web

Mobile Font: FF Suhmo Mobile
Webfont: FF Suhmo Web

Mobile Font: FF Tisa Mobile
Webfont: FF Tisa Web

Mobile Font: FF Trixie & FF Hands Mobile
Webfont: FF Trixie Web & FF Hands Web

Mobile Font: FF Yoga Mobile
Webfont: FF Yoga Web

Mobile Font: FF Yoga Sans Mobile
Webfont: FF Yoga Sans Web

Typekit Update Includes Newest Web FontFonts

Have a Typekit account? Integrate the latest Web FontFonts today. Don’t forget, the files include comp fonts for offline design. They also ensure you end up with a smaller file size, additional optimization for Microsoft’s rendering API DirectWrite and improved vertical metrics for consistent baseline positions in all browsers. In many of the files, you can also now choose between Oldstyle Figures and Proportional Lining Figures.

You may also notice we’ve updated the look of this blog with some new webfonts. The headers are now in FF Sero Web and the body text in FF Tisa Web.

Have you given your site a makeover yet? Let us know in the comments!

Five Ways to Impress Your Typography Teacher This Semester

Heading back to the classroom this fall? Forget putting an apple on the desk. Here are some sure-fire ways to impress both your instructors and classmates using tools from FontShop.

5. Readily reference your summer reading from the FontShop Education pages.

4. Design your online portfolio using webfonts. Won’t your professor be impressed when your gorgeous site shows up in search results?

3. Bring up new fonts highlighted in FontShop’s twice monthly newsletters in class discussion.

2. Constantly refer to alternatives for common typefaces and the perfect font for every project.

1. Preload your iPad with the FontBook app, impress your instructor and wow your classmates. And, of course, let us know if you get any dates through showcasing 620,000 type specimens in your lab.

Theresa’s Tips: Choosing the Correct Format

Welcome to a new series from Theresa at our Sales & Support Desk. Any support questions you want answered in the future? Let us know in the comments section.

When purchasing fonts, you want to make sure that you choose the correct format. Here’s a brief overview of the different formats that we have available at FontShop.

OpenType fonts are cross-platform and will work on both Macs and PCs. This format is best used with applications that support OpenType features, such as InDesign. Some OpenType fonts are created with PostScript metrics and others are created with TrueType metrics. Postscript flavored OpenType have .otf ending while TrueType flavored OpenType have .ttf endings.

TrueType fonts will also work on both Macs and PCs. Certain Windows-based applications, such as MS Office, work best with this format because these applications have limited OpenType support.

PostScript fonts only work on either a Mac or a PC, not both. This format is also referred to as Type 1 font. It is an older format that can be difficult to install in newer operating systems.

Webfonts come in EOT/WOFF formats, which use @font-face to embed the font into your site.

To make things easier we’ve added icons on all our products so that you know what format a typeface is available in. Use the guide below to help you navigate through our site.

To learn more about formats visit Help Topics/ Font Format Questions

FontShop Friday Five: Resources & Revisiting

We know you’re busy and the Internet is a crowded place, so we’ll try to give you a little reminder on Fridays of what’s going on out there. Below please find five recent FontShop-related threads that you may have missed.

Brush Up with our Education Resources

Just in time for the start of the school year, we’ve updated our education library with everything you wanted to know about webfonts and how licensing works.

New Foundry & New Fonts in Latest Newsletter

Did you miss our latest newsletter on Wednesday? Read it here. Then check out our new foundry, Canada Type, as well as the great new selections from Sudtipos and Three Islands Press. You can subscribe to newsletters on this page to get this font delight in your inbox twice a month.

A New Perspective on FontBook App

Our new type expert explores the FontBook for iPad.

Be There or Be Square

We’re pretty darn excited for our big designer/developer meetup on Wednesday. Are you coming? Can’t make it? What would you ask our panel if you could?

On the Font Feed

Yves Peters highlights two film projects with a focus on type history. Speaking of film, help Yves show Austin what’s up with Trajan in Movie Posters at SXSW 2012.

Friday Five Fonts: Sugar Pie by Sudtipos and Gibson by Canada Type

New Education Resources: Webfonts & Licensing

Recently we reminded you of our education section on FontShop.com and today we’re happy to announce that we’ve added two new resources to the library.

This semester we are guiding you through the world of webfonts and through the basics of licensing.

Webfonts: A Designer’s Guide

The webfonts guide walks you through the files, shows you how to implement them, and directs you to tools that should help in the design process.

Licensing 101: Free Fonts Are Not Always Free

Borrowing from a popular FontFeed post, our licensing guide takes you through the sometimes murky world of “free” fonts. We know that students utilize free and discounted fonts as they begin their design education. If a font isn’t free, remember that  you can sign up for an account on FontShop.com with your .edu email address and use the promo code Educate10 to obtain 10% off your entire purchase.

Join Us for a Designer/Developer Meetup in San Francisco!

Are you a developer looking to make your app or website more visually appealing? Are you a designer seeking opportunities in tech? Join FontShop and the Storek Building for Visual Meets Virtual, an informal evening aimed to connect developers and designers with one another to build beautiful projects together. Register via Eventbrite today.

We’ll have plenty of refreshments and libations for your enjoyment and a brief, informal presentation by members of the design and development communities (with a short Q&A) on how they view the two disciplines interrelating. Attendees will also be among the first to hear some exciting news from FontShop — you won’t want to miss it!

Day: Wednesday, August 24th
Time: 6-9 p.m.
Location: Storek Building, 155 9th St, San Francisco, CA 94103

Agenda:
6-7 p.m.: Pizza & Libations
7-7:45 p.m.: Panel Discussion and Q&A
7:45-9 p.m.: Mingle with our panelists and other attendees

Panelists:

Cary Dunn, CTO, RightSignature. From the temperate and sleepy beachside town of Santa Barbara, Cary is the development and UI steamboat behind the e-signature company RightSignature. He is a crossbreed developer/designer, which means you’ll often find him wireframing in code rather than Photoshop. He lives his life at local coffee shops, spends late nights hacking code, and always has a few new products brewing.

Chris Palmatier is a designer, developer, and artist whose restless muse keeps him bouncing between his text editor, vector drawing software, drafting table, and art studio. Over the past 10 years, he has worked as a full-stack web developer and interaction/visual designer, working to create tools that are both usable and delightful for the University of California, IDEO, and Civic Center/Neighborland.org, to name a few. When not working on Internet design and manufacture, he also works on print design and consulting for clients in the East Bay, designs furniture, and creates abstract paintings and sculptures. Chris holds a BFA in Fine Arts (Painting) from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and lives in sunny Oakland, CA.

Gregor Martynus. Having a degree in Media System Design and working for years as developer, designer and in between, Gregor understands the different languages of both sides. Potential gets lost in translation and wrong expectation – let’s talk synergies. Gregor is the founder of minutes.io, an HTML5 app to take & share meeting notes. He enjoys working at coworking spaces and is moving once or twice per year. After San Francisco, he’ll move to Zurich with his wife. Spare time activities include traveling, photography and snowboarding.

Make sure to register here!

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