Tag Archives: Webfont

Buyer’s Guide: Webfont Licenses

Still confused about webfont licenses? Here are our top five Buyer’s Guides to common questions about webfonts on FontShop.

1. Self-Hosted vs. Hosted
Learn the difference between the two types of webfont hosting.

2. How webfonts are licensed.
Discover who should be licensed and how.

3. What formats are webfonts available in? 
With @font-face you can use various formats, but your license may only cover specific ones.

4. Can all webfonts sold on FontShop be linked to Typekit?
Tips on how to recognize webfonts that can be brought into a Typekit account.

5. Can I install EOT or WOFF on my computer?
Find out if you need a desktop license too!

As a bonus, check out out our education page where you can find tips on how to use type in print and on the web.

And if you have additional questions you can always email FontShop’s Support Team for help.

Buyer’s Guide: What formats are webfonts available in?

webfontformats2Typically, webfonts are available in EOT and WOFF formats — if you don’t know what these formats are, you can check out our What is EOT and WOFF? post.

FontShop‘s webfont selection is limited to the formats that the foundries supply and is not available in TTF or SVG formats. Under many of the foundries’ licensing terms, converting fonts to other formats for web use is not allowed. Always double-check a foundry’s End User License Agreement to be sure what is and isn’t allowed.

Buyer’s Guide: Can this webfont be linked to Typekit?

Currently, you can only link webfonts from FontFont (also known as Web FontFonts) — webfonts that begin with “FF” in their name, such as FF Meta Web or FF Suhmo Web — to your Typekit account.

Hosting with Typekit

When you purchase a Web FontFont, you will be given a voucher code that links your Web FontFonts to your Typekit account. Send your Web FontFonts to Typekit by clicking on the link given to you when your purchase is complete. When you click on this link, you should be taken to a page that should look something like this:

At this point, you will be able to double-check to make sure you are linking the correct Web FontFonts to your Typekit account. You can then sign in to your Typekit account or create a new account.

If you don’t find a yellow box with a link to send your webfonts to Typekit when you’ve completed your purchase, you can still use webfonts. Remember, Typekit is completely optional and all webfonts on FontShop can be self-hosted!

Buyer’s Guide: How to Extend Your Current License

Does your current font license support your needs? If not, then FontShop can help you find out. Send a message to Sales with your questions and we’ll help you sort everything out.

series3-numberofusers

You may need a Multi-User license, MUL for short, if you purchased a basic license in the past and your company has grown and needs to accomodate multiple locations or additional users.

We can also help you extend your license to support web and mobile.

Buyer’s Guide: Font Formats

A couple weeks ago, we talked about how TrueType works with Macs — but what about the other formats, you ask? Let’s take a look at the different font formats:

OpenType, TrueType, and PostScript are the various formats that you might find fonts available in. OpenType and TrueType are compatible on both Macs and PCs while PostScript fonts are computer-specific. Webfonts come in two formats — EOT and WOFF — that you can read more about in our “What is EOT and WOFF?” post. If you’re deciding which format is the best option for you, here are some points to remember:

OpenType fonts are usually the best option, as they work on both Mac and PCs. However, not all applications are “OpenType-savvy”, so there might be some cool OpenType features like swashes and stylistic alternates that you may not be able to access if you don’t plan on using design tools such as Adobe Creative Suite programs.

TrueType fonts are a better choice if you plan on using Microsoft Office programs such as Word or Powerpoint. MS Office programs have little to no support for OpenType and tend to have issues accessing those cool swashes you want to use.

PostScript fonts are a legacy format that tend to cause issues on newer computers, which is typically why we suggest choosing OpenType or TrueType whenever possible. PostScript fonts are computer specific, meaning they will only work on either a Mac or PC, not both.

Webfonts cannot be installed on your computer but are instead used in coding for websites, typically using the @font-face CSS rule.

While browsing the fonts on FontShop, you’ll notice that they’ll have some kind of indicator of what format they’re available in, similar to the icons in the Font Format guide above.

Buyer’s Guide: Can all webfonts sold on FontShop be linked to Typekit?

Currently, you can only link Web FontFonts — webfonts that begin with “FF” in their name, such as FF Meta Web or FF Suhmo Web — to your Typekit account.

Hosting with Typekit

When you purchase a Web FontFont, you will be given a voucher code that links your Web FontFonts to your Typekit account. Send your Web FontFonts to Typekit by clicking on the link given to you when your purchase is complete. When you click on this link, you should be taken to a page that should look something like this:

At this point, you will be able to double-check to make sure you are linking the correct Web FontFonts to your Typekit account. You can then sign in to your Typekit account or create a new account.

If you don’t find a yellow box with a link to send your webfonts to Typekit when you’ve completed your purchase, you can still use webfonts. Remember, Typekit is completely optional and all webfonts on FontShop can be self-hosted!

Buyer’s Guide: Am I buying a webfont?

Not all fonts on FontShop are available as webfonts. If you’re wondering whether you’re adding a webfont to your cart or not, here are a few things to look out for that will let you know you’re licensing the right kind of fonts:

1. Web Badges

When you do a general search for a font, several options may come up in the search results. Webfonts are easy to spot because they have Web Badges — a blue one in the upper right hand corner of a font listing and a gray one next to the price.

2. Font Name

Besides having badges to indicate if the font is a webfont, a webfont will have the word “Web” in its name.

3. Webfont Formats

Webfonts are usually available in two formats: WOFF and EOT. If you see anything else listed under Formats — like OT, TT, OT/TT, or PS — then you are not looking at a webfont!

4. Pricing By Pageviews

When you’re ready to checkout, there is one more way to ensure you’re licensing webfonts. Webfonts are priced based on pageviews per month, not the number of users who will be using the fonts. Instead of having to enter the number of users you need to license as you would with desktop fonts, you will need to choose a pricing tier based on the number of pageviews per month your website generates.

If you’re ready to get some webfonts, you can browse our selection of webfonts here!

Theresa’s Tip: A Designer’s Guide to Webfonts

You’ve heard about Web FontFonts, but if you’re still not sure what they are and how to use them then don’t fret. FontShop created a guide to get you up to date on what webfonts are and how to use Web FontFonts. Just go to our education page to view the guide online and if you need to brush up on your typography then we have guides for that too.

You can also download the PDF here.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 59,537 other followers