Tag Archives: typography

Next FontShop: A Bold Undertaking

Check it out. The next FontShop website is in beta. It’s raw. It’s unfinished. It’s in flux. But we’re launching it anyway.

Why? Because we love the new design, and we want YOU to help us shape its development. Seriously. The site at next.fontshop.com is an open invitation for you to explore, have fun and test out the simplified, playful new design.

And then we want you to let loose: tell us what you love about it, what you hate about it, and above all, tell us what you want us to add to it. As you submit ideas and requests, we’ll continue to build on the initial foundation-stone, regularly publishing new features and modules based on your feedback over the coming months.

It’s all part of an experiment in collaborative agile design, jointly conceived and fostered by FontShop and the creative minds at Edenspiekermann. Its purpose is to get you, the public, to participate in the design process, and help create the perfect place to find fonts.

In the true spirit of the project, we’re not even going to bother extolling the beauty and the simplicity of the design here. Instead, we say only: go see it for yourself. Form your own opinion. Then tell us what you think.

Halloween at FontShop San Francisco

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Happy Halloween from the team at FontShop San Francisco!

Although our costumes aren’t typographic in nature, we thought we’d recommend a couple of designs that match our individual styles today.

Meghan’s PUNKin outfit pairs well with anything from our Distressed or Industrial & Urban Decay FontLists.

FF Manga matches Theresa’s anime-inspired outfit perfectly.

David’s sailor costume will get you through these waterlogged fonts.

Finally, Molly feels the Spooky family best sums up her look today.

What typeface best captures your spirit today? Tell us in the comments.

Pinterested: Great Pairs!

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As announced earlier this week, FontShop’s Wedding Month starts next month! Just over a week away, you can prepare by getting acquainted with our Great Pairs pinboard. Every Wednesday, our type expert David Sudweeks pairs two typefaces available on FontShop; you can easily view and find all past pairs on Pinterest!

Pinterested: New pins this week

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Besides new fonts and promotions, we love pinning cool type we find around the web! Check out how Oreo celebrated their 100th birthday or create a message in Neko Font (“Cat” Font) — follow us on Pinterest for weekly typographic finds!

Pinterested: Ideas & Inspiration

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Today is the second and last day of TYPO SF. Our speakers are awesomely inspiring — if your brain begs for more inspiration over the weekend, find typographic projects and posts on our Ideas & Inspiration pinboard. Aside from this one board on Pinterest, we have almost 60 boards that may help get your creative juices flowing for your next or future projects including Found TypeLettering, and Swashbucklers.

Be sure to follow us on Pinterest to keep up with the new pinboards we create regularly for you!

TYPO San Francisco Announces Type Track

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We can’t believe TYPO San Francisco Contrast is just around the corner on April 11 & 12.

Despite its name, the overall focus of TYPO is on design as a whole, not just typography. That said, we’re pleased the organizers added a Type Track this year in the intimate, 100-seat screening room.

More about the track:

It’s not all smoke and mirrors. Learn some of the secrets to creating a successful business in typography on Friday with moderator Carima El-Behairy, of P22 Foundry, and five speakers who will address various aspects of the type industry. Bring your questions, they have answers.

Don’t miss this conference! Get your ticket today.

FontShop Plugin Now Supports Adobe Fireworks

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Adding yet another design program to its repertoire, the FontShop Plugin is now compatible with Adobe® Fireworks®. Now you can see how different type options will look on web and mobile before you buy and without leaving your document.

The free FontShop Plugin lets you preview any of our 150,000+ fonts, in the context of your own artwork in Adobe® Photoshop®, Adobe® Illustrator®, Adobe® InDesign®, or Adobe® Fireworks® (CS5, CS5.5 and CS6). This is a great new way to find the perfect typographic fit for your project.

Features:

  • Supports Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign & Fireworks
  • Preview fonts in your document
  • Search by name, designer or foundry
  • Collect and tag favorite fonts

>> Download the FREE FontShop Plugin

And because if you’re not a Fireworks user, this may now be in your head, we’ll help you with that too:




 

Pinterested: Typography 101

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We have lots of typography boards on Pinterest and it’s easy to get lost in them. But one of the most important boards is our Typography 101 pinboard — it’s a place where you’ll learn about fonts and using type! Those who are new to the world of typography, those who dabble, design students and professionals should bookmark this board; we’ll be continuing to expand this board with lots of great information from David’s Using Type series to other fun facts and important tidbits from our Buyer’s Guide series on licensing and finding fonts.

Pinterested: New pins this week

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It’s a new year and with a new year comes new trends. As we pointed out last week, we won’t stop pinning in our Type Trends pinboard, but don’t forget to check out our other pinboards to see what’s happening out there in the type world!

Our Found Type board will show well-known (and a few not so obvious) typefaces used in different ways to help demonstrate how something as common as Didot or Avant Garde can still make a design look good. Or if you’re stuck in a creative block, how about visiting our Ideas & Inpiration pinboard? Here, you’ll find various uses of type from lettering to lasercut acrylic or wood (and other physical type) as well as fun and awesome uses of typography.

Follow us on Pinterest and have fun look at type all weekend long!

Pinterested: New boards this week

Raise your hand if you like handmade type! We created two new boards on Pinterest this week that tie in with our Typographic Trend this week.

As our font expert, David, mentioned in his Typographic Trend post yesterday, some fonts are influenced by actual handwriting. Our In Your Face: FF Mister K board puts the spotlight on one of our own FontFonts that falls into this category of “handmade” type. FF Mister K is a family of four that was inspired by the handwriting of writer Franz Kafka. Check out the different cuts of FF Mister K on FontShop!

We also pinned a different approach to what “handmade” type can mean. On our Getting Out Of Hand board, you’ll find a collection of type and images and designs made out of hands or done on hands. You’ll find words spelled out in sign language and also letters shaped with fingers.

Can you handle our new boards this week?

Pinterested: New boards this week

Dive into our Pinterest boards this week with a recap of the Great American Typefaces we covered in our July 4th Newsletter and a collection of fun fonts on our water-themed board.

Last month, we listed out our Top 10 Great American Typefaces in our July 4th Newsletter — if you need to refresh your memory or are feeling patriotic, our Great American Faces board features the fonts from our Independence Day focus on American typography including Sweet Sans and Goudy’s Decorative Initials.

As the end of summer is nearing, it’s still important to stay hydrated! August is National Water Quality Month in the US, so we went fishing in our ocean of fonts for some water-themed faces from Linotype’s WaterFlag Regular and F2F Whale Tree Std Regular to Electric Typographer’s Finfont — you can find these gems in our Water You Waiting For board.

Quench your thirst for typography with these two new Pinterest boards!

Pinterested: New boards this week

This week got off to an exciting start with pictures from Mars, so we felt the need to travel through space and time using the cosmic selection of fonts available at FontShop. We created two fun Pinterest boards — you can choose to space out in a galaxy of fonts or ride on a typographic carousel!

Blasting off with inspiration from familiar Sci-Fi movie posters, you’ll find fonts that fit your futuristic, techno, or alien design needs on our Spacing Out board. Dare mighty things with Starlet Bold from Gestalten or have a friend decode a message you set in Aliens OT from Elsner+Flake.

Did you know that National Clown Week in the US is August 1–7? If you missed clowning around, don’t worry — our That’s In Tents! board will help you catch up on the fun. With a board full of lively fonts, you can use Plaza or the layered Dusty Circus Family to create your own circus at home.

Check us out on Pinterest to find these quirky characters that will take you through the cosmos and into a circus. Intense!

Pinterested: New boards this week

This week, we got in touch with our inner video game geek and our crafty side. We have two new Pinterest boards up where you’ll be able to look into the world of video games and sewing through typography!

From cross-stitching to knitting, we have a selection of fonts and fStop images that will help inspire you to finish those last few scarf rows or that last page in your summer scrapbook. Take a look at our Sew Creative board — Stina Regular and P22 Folk Art Cross will keep you stitching!


We also put together a collection of pixel fonts that will remind you of the days you had to blow into a cartridge to make a game work. Our Like A Boss board brings back 8-bit memories — finding the Triforce, fighting off the undead in Transylvania, realizing the Princess is in another castle. Maybe you can use Lomo Std or Sys Flash Ten and create your own video game.

Before you dust off that NES in your closet or go searching for embroidery needles, be sure to follow us on Pinterest — the Fontlympics are still going on!

Have a Pinterest-ing weekend!

Just like webfonts and OpenType in the font world, there’s no escaping Pinterest in the social media realm. We created boards to share with you on Pinterest — from new fonts to type in the wild to inspiring typography designs, we’ll be pinning some of our favorite finds from around the internet as well as showing off the great fonts we have available on FontShop!

If you miss an update or like to go back to see old posts such as our Staff Picks, our Pinterest boards will be a good source to keep you up to speed with our happenings. New fonts available on FontShop and any announcements can be seen on our New & Noteworthy board and helpful resources we have to offer can be found on our Typography 101 board.

If you’re feeling nostalgic, we also have a visual list of the fonts that were featured in our Best of 2011 newsletter last year. We’ll be recapping our Best of 2011 Typefaces through Pinterest with more eye candy for your typographical needs.

Every week, we’ll feature a typeface and showcase examples of fonts in use as well as relevant images from fStop with our “In Your Face” boards (e.g. Bello Pro). You’ll also be able to learn more about type designers with our “Designer Spotlight” boards (e.g. Goudy), which will focus on their work and influence.

We like to have fun here at FontShop — if you’re Pinterested, check out some of our other boards: Swashbucklers, Drop Cap It Like It’s Hot, and Amplified!

Designer Spotlight: Giddy for Goudy

“A man who would letterspace lower case would steal sheep.” So said Frederic Goudy, according to rumor.  "Who is this passionate defender of legibility? (And inspiration for the title of Erik Spiekermann's typography guide)?” you may ask.

Meet the American type designer whose 100+ typefaces include Goudy Old Style, the graceful, easy-reading serif that Harper’s Magazine still uses for text, and Copperplate Gothic, a gothic/serif hybrid over a century old and still on your lawyer’s business card. Prolific and experimental, Goudy’s (b. 1865, d. 1947) life and career mirrors the period of U.S. history between the Civil War and World War II.

Known as one of the world’s greatest type designers in 1933, when The New Yorker profiled him as “Glorifier of the Alphabet,” Goudy advocated harmony and simplicity in design. He championed beauty and refinement − but not at the expense of personality. In fact, says FontShop Type Expert David Sudweeks, “You can tell it’s Goudy before you’re close enough to read it.”

If we had our way, Goudy would be on the list of all-American highlights we cheer about at Fourth of July picnics, right up there with baseball, apple pie, and backyard fireworks.

As fortune had it, however, European Modernism and Bauhaus design − with their assertively angular buildings and clean-edged letters − swept the Western world with enough force to cloud our collective memory of Goudy’s stature.

“Much of it was lost in the shuffle. When the Erbars and Futuras and Helveticas came in, the Goudy was tossed out, recast into slugs, leading, bullets and fishing weights,” explains Sudweeks.

Fortune wasn’t consistently good to Goudy during his lifetime either. He showed early promise but later found himself deep in a rut. A childhood encounter with an artist’s camera and winning a drawing prize at the county fair creatively inspired young Frederic. As a teen, he seemed destined for a career in the arts. That’s when he provided his Bloomington, Ill. Sunday school with a stenciled version of the Ten Commandments. Impressed, the church paid him for his work.

In his early 30s, Goudy married Bertha M. Sprinks, a stenographer and officemate about whom he later wrote, “her intelligent and ready counsel I welcomed and valued; her consummate craftsmanship made possible many difficult undertakings.”

A decade later, though his marriage may have been a match made in heaven, Goudy’s career was barely out of the gate. In a 1942 retrospect, Popular Mechanics reported, “At 40, this short, plump, pinkish, and puckish gentleman kept books for a Chicago realtor, and considered himself a failure.”

Eventually things started looking up. The Popular Mechanics article continues, “During the next 36 years, starting almost from scratch at an age when most men are permanently set in their chosen vocations, he cut 113 fonts of type, thereby creating more usable faces than did the seven greatest inventors of type and books, from Gutenberg to Garamond.”

He was among the founders of Camelot Press, where he sold his first typeface, Camelot, to a Boston printer for $10. He helped found Village Press and served as art director for the Lanston Monotype Machine Company from 1920 till 1940. He taught at the Art Students League and New York University. Goudy wrote several books, including The Alphabet (1918), Elements of Lettering (1922), Typologia (1940), and the autobiographical A Half-Century of Type Design and Typography, 1895-1945 (1946).

Upon Goudy’s death in 1947 the New York Herald Tribune‘s warm and reverent obituary read, “The entire reading public is in Mr. Goudy’s debt.” It also said, “Only time will tell how his type faces endure, but he gave a vast impetus to the art of printing.”

Endure they did. Designers still use Goudy Old Style for a classic, American feel, and should you come across it, Goudy Ornate still holds a contemporary appeal. The 1922 Goudy Sans has occasionally fooled a type expert or two into thinking it’s a more recent font. (Though the capital “A” is a dead giveaway; it sends us right back to the days Charlie Chaplin.) There’s even a free Goudy webfont, Sorts Mill Goudy, a 2011 revival of Goudy Old Style. (Use it in “light line jobs like poetry,” advises Macworld Magazine.)

So next time you get an attorney’s contact information or page through the print edition of America’s oldest general interest monthly, be sure to light a bottle rocket or dish up a slice of apple pie in memory of Frederic Goudy.

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Article text by Kris Vagner

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