Tag Archives: swashes

Buyer’s Guide: Picking script fonts for non-design programs

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A couple weeks ago, we talked about picking scripts for design programs. This week, we’ll discuss picking the right swashy font for those who will be using them in programs like Microsoft Office or iWorks applications.

Picking scripts for non-design programs gets a little bit tricky. Microsoft Office does not handle OpenType features well — these OpenType features include the beautiful stylistic or contextual alternates available in some script typefaces that you might want to use and are discussed in our Using Type: Contextual Alternates, Ligatures post. Don’t worry: there are script fonts that are made to work in Word or Pages, if that’s what you’ll be designing your invitations or printing your envelopes from.

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For example, let’s take Feel Script and Mahogany Script. Feel Script is beautiful and a quite popular typeface for wedding collateral. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work well in Microsoft Office or Pages. If you take a look at the Character Set for Feel Script, you’ll see that this one font alone has over 1,000 glyphs:

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On the product page for Feel Script, you can view all the glyphs in the character set as well as see how many glyphs total there are. If a script font has over 1,000 glyphs, it’s safe to say that it won’t work as well in Microsoft Office or Pages. Many of the basic glyphs (such as the default uppercase and lowercase letters and default numeral set) would work in non-design programs, but if you had your eye on a beautiful curve in the Stylistic or Contextual Alternates, you’re likely to be disappointed that you can’t use or access them. Pages may be able to access some Stylistic Alternates, but it’s not guaranteed. Instead, Mahogany Script is a good alternative solution.

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Bickham Script Pro is another popular wedding typeface that does not work well in Microsoft Office programs. Fortunately, there are a lot of alternatives to use, like Helinda Rook. Let’s take a look at Helinda’s character set:

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Compared to a more complex font like Feel Script, you’ll notice that there are no Stylistic or Contextual Alternates listed and the total number of glyphs is pretty small. It’s safe to assume that a script font that has about 200 to 300 total glyphs will work just fine in Word or Pages, especially if there are no Alternates listed. You might also find that some of these fonts with smaller character sets are listed as “PC TrueType” format fonts — do note that PC TrueType fonts do work on Macs!

Also, some fonts that are usable on Word or Pages do have Alternates, but the Alternates are treated differently:

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For example, here’s Sloop. If you do want to use a font with Stylistic Alternates, some fonts are divided into separate font files. Here, you’ll see “Sloop Script One”, “Two”, and “Three”. At a glance, they all look similar, but you’ll notice that some letters have more swashes to them. Instead of treating these swashy alternates as OpenType features, they are offered as separate font files for those who use programs that can’t access OpenType features — you’ll need to install all three font files to access the alternates.

Stay tuned this week for our Using Type post on Thursday which will address accessing OpenType features in programs such as Pages or Word.

If you’re still having trouble choosing a font or something similar to a font you can’t use in Word or Pages, don’t hesitate to contact our Sales & Support team — we’ll help you find the right font for your needs!

Buyer’s Guide: Picking script fonts for design programs

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Many of the script fonts available on FontShop have contextual alternates, stylistic alternates, or just beautiful swashes in general that would work well for wedding invitations. But how do you know which font to say “I do” to?

If you’re working in Adobe Creative Suite programs (such as InDesign, Illustrator, or Photoshop), you’re in luck. Fonts with lots of contextual and stylistic alternates work well in these programs. To get started, you can browse our Full-Featured Formal Scripts FontList. A typeface like SudtiposPoem Script Pro has many options to choose from. The uppercase “I” alone has six additional stylistic alternates — you can say “I do” in multiple ways!

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Full-featured formal scripts are fun to work with, but only if you’re using them in design programs like Adobe Creative Suite. You can read more on how to access alternates in Photoshop or Illustrator in our Using Type: Contextual Alternates, Ligatures post. If you’re designing your wedding invitations or other materials in different programs like Microsoft Office or iWorks applications, you have to be a bit more choosy. Poem Script has a total of 1,675 glyphs in its character set — some programs just can’t access all of these alternates. Stay tuned for Part 2 of picking script fonts for use in other programs.

Pinterested: Swashbucklers

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FontShop’s Wedding Month starts next week! Along with our Great Pairs pinboard, prepare yourself with the pins on the Swashbucklers board. If you’re working on save-the-dates and invitations, this pinboard will provide plenty of swashy inspiration!

Pinterested: New pins this week

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We don’t just pin cool things to one board every week. While our New & Noteworthy and Ideas & Inspiration pinboards are good places to start for eye candy, don’t forget about our other boards that might help you get through a case of the Mondays or an uneventful Friday night. Check out:

  • Lettering: Because handmade creations aren’t dead! Handcrafted words are still very much alive.
  • Character Studies: Find personalities in different individual glyphs!
  • Swashbuckers: Swoon over beautiful curves left and right.
  • Found Type: Seeing fonts in use might help you along in your next project!

But remember, we have almost 60 boards for you to peruse over and and over again!

Typographic Turn-ons: Sexy Swashes

Our  Typographic Turn-ons series continues.

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He spotted her from across the room, her curves drawing him into the whole word, impossible to look away. Though italics always rang his bell, her forms brought something more to the table…he could never go back. Yes, he’d fallen head over heels for swashes.

Swashes derive from italics. When you look at the capitals from most italics, they’re just sort of oblique roman forms. Want to spice them up? Some fonts include extra glyphs to make those letters follow a more cursive construction.

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Ready to start swinging with swashes? If swashes are available in your font, turn them on through the OpenType panel in your design program, or you can pick them one-by-one out of the glyph palette.

Contrary to popular assumption, swashes and flourishes are different – although if you want to get freaky with flourishes, by all means go ahead!

DIY: Want to find some sultry swashes! We recommend a dalliance with Farnham Display . We’ve also got a Fontlist full of Serifs with Swashes for you to explore.

Pinterested: Love At First Type

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As you anticipate the beginning our Typographic Turn-ons series next week, our Love At First Type pinboard will help you get through the weekend if you’re sweating for swashes. We’ve pinned typefaces that will warm your heart and fonts that we’re smitten with here at FontShop. We’ll continue to pin more lovely fonts and maybe you might choose to buy your sweetheart a font for Valentine’s Day instead of a bouquet of roses, because, let’s be honest, desktop font licensing for one user is forever. Many years from now, your loved one will still be able to type out their love for you in Fiorentina, compared to just reminiscing about or staring longingly at a picture of a beautiful bunch of flowers you bought them once upon a time.

Pinterested: New pins this week

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If you were in too much of a food coma over the Thanksgiving weekend and missed some of the typographic food FontShop posted for you, don’t worry — we’ve pinned it.

In our New & Noteworthy board, you can catch up to recent events and our newest fonts from the past week or so. You’ll find that registration for TYPO SF is up and running and that we have some swashtastic new fonts like Fan Script OT from Sudtipos.

We also continue to post more holiday fonts in our Festive Fonts board to help you get started on any holiday greetings you’re designing to send out to friends and family.

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