Tag Archives: Rubrik

Type Trends: The Monospaced Aesthetic

When we left off last time I was right in the middle of monospace as a tacked-on nice-to-have variant for well developed superfamilies. Something changed though around the turn of the last century as designers in growing numbers seemed to turn back and look at the loose monospace aesthetic, appreciating it for what it was on its own. In contrast to what I call ‘documentary’ types—single face revivals mainly, entire families were begun to exist solely in monospace, or with monospace as a starting point. It’s this last point that I’m keen on identifying. What faces have you seen that aren’t monospaced, but come from the same, loosely spaced tradition?

FF Magda Clean Mono

Critzla, Cornel Windlin, & Henning Krause’s FF Magda Clean / Mono, 1998.

Kettler

In 2002, Process Type’s first release was a monospace, Kettler, named after Howard Kettler, the designer of Courier and several other typewriter type designs.

MVB Fantabular

Akemi Aoki’s MVB Fantabular, 2002. Nitti Pieter van Rosmalen’s Nitti, 2007, now with italic, as of a couple weeks ago. Nitti feels to me to have taken its lessons from Helvetica Monospaced and similar Monospaced 821. It’s one of the most even-colored monospaced faces, even in its heavier weights.

Alix FBMatthew Butterick’s Alix FB, 2011. FF Suhmo  Alex Rütten’s FF Suhmo, 2010. Not monospaced, but still exhibiting some of its effects.

Treza

Benjamin Gomez’s Treza, 2010.

Rubrik

Miles Newlyn’s Rubrik, 2011. Miles cites the monospace aesthetic of the typewriter when starting on Rubrik.

Typographic Countdown — 4 Days ’til the New Year

With four days left to go, we’re jumping ahead to the number 3. Three, along with the rest of the Arabic numerals, comes from a completely different tradition than our alphabet. The ten digits in question are about as Arabic as the Latin alphabet is English. They developed over hundreds of years under the hands of mathematicians in India, spread to Persia, and ultimately the whole of the western world during the middle ages.

Threes with a flat top, like in Miles Newlyn’s Rubrik are harder to turn into eights that those with a curved top.

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