Tag Archives: Licenses

Buyer’s Guide: Fontsmith EULA

FTS

Based in London, Fontsmith is a type design studio founded by Jason Smith. Built with a team dedicated to designing and developing quality contemporary typefaces they independently release great families like FS Me and FS Sinclair. Here are some highlights from their EULA.

Basic EULA Rights

  • Desktop use supports up to 1 computer at a single geographic location.
  • You can create a secured non-editable PDF only if you subset the font.

Restrictions

  • You cannot share the font with users that do not have a license for the same font.
  • You cannot embed the font into a Website or Application.

See Fontsmith EULA

If you have additional questions you can always email FontShop’s Support Team for help.

EULA highlights will be posted every other Monday. Next up is Bold Monday.

Buyer’s Guide: TypeTogether EULA

TTGVeronika Burian and José Scaglione started TypeTogether in 2006 after meeting at the University of Reading in the UK. The foundry focuses on creating innovative and stylish solutions to old problems for the professional market of text typefaces with a focus on editorial use. With a diverse collection of fonts, like Bree and Maiola, the foundry has become a household name among editorial designers. Here are a few highlights from TypeTogether’s EULA.

Basic EULA Rights

  • Desktop use supports up to 5 users in 1 geographic location.
  • You can take a temporary copy of the font to a commercial printer or service bureau for printing or viewing your document.
  • You can use the font to create a logo.

Restrictions

  • You cannot share the font with users that do not have a license for the same font.
  • You cannot embed the font into a Website or Application.
  • You cannot create alphabet or letterform-related products for resale using the font.

See TypeTogether EULA

If you have additional questions you can always email FontShop’s Support Team for help.

EULA highlights will be posted every other Monday. Next up is LucasFonts.

Buyer’s Guide: Font Bureau EULA

FBFor over twenty years, Font Bureau has been providing some of the best typeface designs in the industry. Their font collection continues to grow and with popular faces like Whitman, Benton Sans, and Heron the foundry has been one of our customer’s favorites! Here are some EULA highlights that you may want to keep in mind when licensing a font from Font Bureau.

Basic EULA Rights

  • Desktop use supports up to 1 CPU.
  • You may create a non-editable PDF for output printing to a service bureau for printer.

Restrictions

  • You cannot share the fonts with users that do not have a license for the same fonts.
  • You cannot embed the font into documents that are distributed to third parties without additional licensing.
  • You cannot embed the font into a Website or Application.
  • You cannot embed the font into Flash animations.

See Font Bureau EULA

If you have additional questions you can always email FontShop’s Support Team for help.

EULA highlights will be posted every other Monday. Next up is Emigre.

Buyer’s Guide: Finding the End User License Agreement

buyersguide-eulas

Here at FontShop, we have thousands of fonts. In turn, we sell fonts from many different foundries. Each foundry has their own End User License Agreement (EULA), which is important to read before purchasing a font.

There are a couple different ways to find the EULA for a font. If you know the foundry of the font you’re interested in, you can go to our Licenses page, which lists out every EULA by foundry.

You can also find a link to a font’s EULA at the bottom of its product’s page:

series3-licenseagreement

End User License Agreements are rules to follow when you want to use a font. You’ll want to keep in mind that you are not purchasing the typeface itself, but a license to use the font software. Don’t forget to read the EULA!

Buyer’s Guide: Buying Fonts For Others

For those of you who have designers in your family or friends that would light up at the idea of some new swashes to play around with in Illustrator this holiday season, how about getting them a font that they’ve had their eye on? This may also be the chance to license some fonts for your parents to replace those dreaded system defaults on their old computer sitting in the living room at home.

If you’re thinking that licensing a typeface like Aranjuez Pro may be the best present for your loved ones, be sure that their name and address is under the Licensee Address information before placing your order — they will need to be licensed to use the font before you send it to them, so don’t forget to double-check this part!

BuyingFontsForOthers

Once you’ve added the fonts to your cart and entered your payment information, you’ll be able to change the Licensee information when you review your order on the Order Confirmation page. The Licensee Address will default to the primary address listed in your account, so you’ll need to change it if it’s still under your name. A link to change the Licensee Address will be under the second section with the Address Information; when you click to edit the Licensee info, you’ll be able to enter the new information. Be sure to fill in all required details!

BuyingFontsForOthers2

When you’re done entering the new license address, click on the “Next” button and you’ll be able to complete your order. Since you’ll be getting the download link after completing your purchase, you’ll need to download the ZIP file with a copy of the EULA to give as a gift — send it off in an email the night before Christmas and wait for a fresh design with the newly licensed typeface!

Take a look at our Bestsellers and New Fonts to get some ideas of which fonts may be the best to gift this holiday season!

Theresa’s Tips: Buying Fonts for Others

It’s never too early to think about purchasing a gift for a loved one this holiday season and sometimes trying to find something for the creative individual on your list can be daunting. So how about purchasing a license for a typeface on their want list?

For example, I’m purchasing Filmotype Gay OT for a friend and I want to make sure that the license is under their name. Once I’ve placed the product in my cart and entered the payment information, I’ll be taken to the order confirmation page where I can change the license.

Looks like the license is still in my name, so I’ll have to change it. And once that’s done I’ll be all set to purchase the license.

Since the font isn’t licensed to me, I’ll have to download the zip file with a copy of the EULA to give to my friend. Wasn’t that easy? Now the hard part is narrowing down the typefaces you want to license!

Theresa’s Tips: Desktop, Web, and Mobile Licenses

If you’re starting your project, you’ll want to think about where you will want your typeface to live. Do you want to create mobile applications for the iPhone? Will you need to spruce up your website? Are you creating marketing materials or graphics for a product? So many questions, but hopefully I can help you sort out the type of license you’ll need with this brief overview of what FontShop offers.

When viewing our site you’ll see three types of licenses: Desktop, Web, and Mobile. A desktop license allows a font to live on your computer. The software is installed on your system so that you can use that font in various programs, such as MS Office or Adobe Creative Suite. Most desktops licenses do not allow you to include the font software on your website or mobile app, so additional licenses are needed.

Web licenses allow your fonts to live on your website using the CSS @font-face rule. Fonts that are made for the web can be in different formats, with the most common being WOFF. You can view all webfonts available here.

Mobile licenses are the latest addition and will allow a developer to include fonts into an app. The best part of a mobile license is that once the developers are licensed, they are not limited to the number of apps they can create and the license is perpetual, just like web and desktop licenses. Also, Mobile Fonts have web and desktop counter parts.

Theresa’s Tips: Licenses, Your Cart, and Quotes

Before your purchase, pay attention to these three things: Licenses, Your Cart, and Quotes. We will use FF Meta as the example and start with Licenses.

End User License Agreements, EULAs for short, are rules to follow when you want to use a font. You’ll want to keep in mind that you are not purchasing the typeface itself, but a license to use the font software. Because we have 100+ foundries that have their own EULA and you might not want to read every single one, we added a shortcut to a product’s EULA at the bottom of their page.

Your Cart keeps track of the number fonts you’ve added and the subtotal provided is the cost of a basic EULA. The most recent additions to your cart will be shown, up to five, and are linked to the product page. Just hit View Cart to see all the fonts you’ve added.

Quotes are easily obtained once you’ve added the items you need to purchase to the cart. Fonts are licensed in blocks of users, you will have to enter the number of computers that you will need to support, and the cart will automatically calculate your subtotal. The default number of users is the cost of a basic EULA.

If your company is growing, you can always extend your license to support additional computers by contacting us. We’ll also answer any additional questions you may have before your purchase. Whew! That was a lot to cover.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 61,750 other followers