Tag Archives: font formats

Buyer’s Guide 101

With the New Year comes new questions … or the same ones. Below is our list of the best Buyer’s Guide tips we have for any type enthusiasts and designers out there who want to license fonts during their winter break or anyone who’s missed our previous Buyer’s Guide tips:

1. Font Formats
Double check the fonts in your cart before licensing them to make sure you have the format you need or the format that has the best compatibility with the system or programs you’re running!

2. What is EOT and WOFF?
Increase your understanding of the web formats available before licensing fonts for the web.

3. Can All Webfonts Be Linked To Typekit?
You’ve learned the difference between desktop licensing and web licensing and have decided you need to purchase some webfonts. If you have a Typekit account, read this Buyer’s Guide tip to make sure if the webfonts you want can be linked to your Typekit account or not.

4. Buying Fonts For Others
Still haven’t gotten gifts for a few people on your list? Don’t worry, you can buy fonts for them — that way, you won’t have to deal with getting out of your pajamas and trying to find parking in crowded shopping lots the day before Christmas.

If you have any other questions about buying fonts, you can view our Buyer’s Guide posts or our Help Topic forums.

help

FontShop is always here to help. Happy FontShopping!

Buyer’s Guide: Font Formats

A couple weeks ago, we talked about how TrueType works with Macs — but what about the other formats, you ask? Let’s take a look at the different font formats:

OpenType, TrueType, and PostScript are the various formats that you might find fonts available in. OpenType and TrueType are compatible on both Macs and PCs while PostScript fonts are computer-specific. Webfonts come in two formats — EOT and WOFF — that you can read more about in our “What is EOT and WOFF?” post. If you’re deciding which format is the best option for you, here are some points to remember:

OpenType fonts are usually the best option, as they work on both Mac and PCs. However, not all applications are “OpenType-savvy”, so there might be some cool OpenType features like swashes and stylistic alternates that you may not be able to access if you don’t plan on using design tools such as Adobe Creative Suite programs.

TrueType fonts are a better choice if you plan on using Microsoft Office programs such as Word or Powerpoint. MS Office programs have little to no support for OpenType and tend to have issues accessing those cool swashes you want to use.

PostScript fonts are a legacy format that tend to cause issues on newer computers, which is typically why we suggest choosing OpenType or TrueType whenever possible. PostScript fonts are computer specific, meaning they will only work on either a Mac or PC, not both.

Webfonts cannot be installed on your computer but are instead used in coding for websites, typically using the @font-face CSS rule.

While browsing the fonts on FontShop, you’ll notice that they’ll have some kind of indicator of what format they’re available in, similar to the icons in the Font Format guide above.

Buyer’s Guide: TrueType works with Macs

Some fonts on FontShop are unfortunately only available in PostScript and TrueType formats. While we generally recommend not purchasing PostScript fonts whenever possible, we understand that Mac users may be concerned about compatibility — don’t worry, TrueType works with Macs!

Although during checkout, the format options may be noted as “PC TrueType”, this format is in fact compatible with Macs. Mac users can install TrueType fonts on their computers. If you’re a Mac user running OSX, we recommend purchasing TrueType instead of Mac PostScript if OpenType is not an option since PostScript is a legacy format that may cause issues on newer computers. TrueType files end in .ttf which you can install and use on Macs.

Next week, we’ll go over the differences of the formats — stay tuned!

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