Tag Archives: David Quay

Kade and Freight Micro

Author’s note: I’m making transparency a central theme in this edition of Great Pairs.

Today we look at David Quay’s Kade together with Joshua Darden’s Freight Micro, and since I’m promoting the new Tryout feature at next.fontshop.com, all of the images shown here link you to their source, where you can go and mess around with the samples, and very possibly come up with something that works even better for your own purposes.

Quickly, let me add that this feature (the new Tryout feature) is limited to webfonts that we offer, so keeping this page open as a reference to what will work is advised: FontShop’s Webfonts. I also recommend against pasting text into the Tryout feature, and also, you should use a modern desktop browser. Going against this advice (as I have as part of testing the feature) will reveal what remains to be fixed, however, the feature’s failure to deliver the expected result looks a lot more like it’s simply not responding to your input. Sticking to options you can be somewhat confident will work will give you a much more positive experience with this tool. Today is May 23, 2013 and the above is all subject to change. Now on to Kade and Freight Micro.

Screen Shot 2014-05-23 at 10.04.11 AM

Reading about Kade, the concept comes from lettering on ships and docks in the Netherlands, an engineer’s approach to letter making. Getting my own good look at the face, I see it doing well in the portrayal of the idea of technical subjects, such as math and sciences. Freight Micro is one optical size of Freight (serif) drawn specifically to function at around 6 pt and below, and part of the larger Freight Super Family.

Screen Shot 2014-05-23 at 10.14.34 AMScreen Shot 2014-05-23 at 10.31.16 AM

The thing that really unifies this combination is its attention to the relationship between interior and exterior contours, hard lines wrapped with taut, smooth ones. In Kade, this is mainly a stylistic decision. In Freight Micro, similar results were arrived at under the constraints of performance at very small sizes. It’s fine, by the way to use a typeface intended for small sizes at larger ones, though be careful of it falling apart. The other way around (using type drawn for large sizes to set text) generally doesn’t work.

Screen Shot 2014-05-23 at 11.11.39 AM

That’s it. Great Pairs land here each *Wednesday.

*though you may have noticed today’s not Wednesday, it’s Friday. I had to replace a bad hard drive and got a little behind this week. Thanks for reading.

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