InDesign Defaults

When Matthew Butterick mentioned this series as a good online source for reading about typography, he also mentioned its general bias towards InDesign in the examples I give. That’s true. And while I deal with and have dealt with plenty of other tools, software and otherwise, for editing, writing, drawing, setting and composing what will ultimately become design that’s typographic in nature, InDesign, particularly the few-generations-old InDesign, is the one I regularly turn to when working with digital type.

Screen Shot 2014-05-08 at 10.13.05 PM

I have to a limited extent touched on the most popular typographic medium, hypertext, and its conveyance, your browser, but it’s still unnecessarily complicated to talk about a simple concept in a simple way, say, kerning, or small caps, when web standards aren’t there yet, and there’s no good way of ensuring that the results I’m getting are the ones you’ll get. Other stuff like columnar layout and text flow, H&J, baseline grids, and the ability to detect the size of final output, are altogether missing from browsers or in their infancy. All that, and the fact that a fixed medium  lends itself well to making a single set of arbitrary and finite adjustments here and there is one of the things that has always drawn me to print work, and for this specific purpose (demonstrating the principles of typography), caused me to remain with a tool made for print production. (That said, I do plan to focus more on typography in the new medium as part of Using Type, but I’ve had a good long run so far sticking to the basics in the old.)

Internal note

As a kind of wrap to what I’ve written in the series thus far I thought, ‘This writing isn’t really giving much of a glimpse into the typographer’s brain; more like the brain stem.’ These principles I’ve covered aren’t what typographers talk about, just as musicians rarely discuss fingerings, or emergency room doctors their stitching technique. These become built-in, and felt, and what happens beyond that point in the creative process becomes much harder to describe. That’s where I want to go though. At least get to something concrete that articulates a principle better than, ‘You’ve just got to feel it.’ There’s wisdom in following one’s instincts, but if the reader doesn’t see the reasoning that leads to the platform from which the typographer instinctively leaps—to the next decision, little good it does. Those benefited are almost exclusively the readers who already understand the concept, those who also ‘just feel it.’

Anyway, forget all this. I’ll get to it and either strike gold or retreat. Today, and over the next couple of weeks, I want to talk more about what happens inside that typographer’s brain stem. And this is shop talk, the painter reviewing his list of brushes and ladders, the photographer his lenses. Kind of as a last final rundown, I want to go specifically over the conscious decisions made working with InDesign before the first project file opens.

General note on setting defaults

When in InDesign, or any of the major CS or CC Adobe apps, the way to set a program-wide default is by setting something while no documents are open. To make document-wide defaults, (and I’m actually not sure this works everywhere) you specify something while nothing in the document is selected. There are other defaults, such as New Document and Print menu defaults, which are set within those menus using a Save Preset dialog.

The defaults

With no documents open, consider what to keep from what’s already chosen for you by default. In the Character palette, set the font family and size if you have one in mind. Here I set mine to Jordi Embodas’s Pona 9 pt and leave the leading set to auto. That’s what the parentheses mean.

Screen Shot 2014-05-08 at 8.58.25 PM

Now, this next part is important. Set the kerning value to Metrics. This, not optical, should be your default. See above.

Screen Shot 2014-05-08 at 9.21.00 PM

Also, through the top rightmost button on the Character palette, which looks like a tiny down arrow next to three horizontal lines, enable Ligatures and Contextual alternates. This last one allows for example complex connected scripts to work as intended.

Screen Shot 2014-05-08 at 9.10.04 PM

On to Paragraph. Select the Align to baseline grid option at the lower right. I also recommend hyphenation being on by default. Change if you disagree, or if the language you primarily work in doesn’t have a very good hyphenation dictionary or whatever.

Screen Shot 2014-05-08 at 9.36.11 PM

The place you set up the baseline grid is under (on the Mac) InDesign > Preferences > Grids, or the same under the Edit menu in Windows. Here I set my increment to 6 pt, and Start at the top, 0 in.

And of course I use points and inches because I’m an American, but if you’d prefer millimeters and centimeters, the same can be set one dialog up from Grids in Units and Increments.

Screen Shot 2014-05-08 at 9.47.47 PM

Unless you work primarily with Pro fonts, the following is ill-advised: Go to Advanced Type and set the Small Cap height to 25%. And while you’re at it, you may consider altering the superscript and subscript values. What will this do? Instead of InDesign surreptitiously inserting fake small caps, this setting will make all fake small caps terribly noticeable. You can then go and replace them with properly drawn and proportioned real small caps. The same goes with these settings for super- and subscripts.

Screen Shot 2014-05-08 at 10.07.44 PM

Screen Shot 2014-05-08 at 9.59.37 PM Screen Shot 2014-05-08 at 10.02.38 PM

Lastly, hyphenation and justification. Follow these settings, referring to my post on the subject to know when to deviate, for example, when exporting a PDF to be read primarily on-screen you should never scale glyphs. These are set from the top rightmost corner of the Paragraph palette. After looking at it, I think I’ll have to revisit my decisions on the hyphenation of certain words or words that lie in precarious places.

That’s it for now. What am I leaving out? Next week we’ll continue on the subject of defaults. Thanks again goes to Jordi Embodas’s Pona (my new default!) for setting the title.

Berling Nova and Neuzeit S

Today we take a brief look at Karl Erik Forsberg’s Berling Nova and Wilhelm Pischner’s Neuzeit S.

Berling-Nova-and-Neuzeit-S-1 Berling-Nova-and-Neuzeit-S-2
One thing quite evident in Berling Nova is its ability to set running text with confidence – the way it carries its weight, and how much it dares use in a text face. The complete set comes also with two display cuts, for larger work, above. Something about this face, its cleanness and lack of ornament led me to find a similarity with Neuzeit S, while looking through the Helvetica Alternatives FontList. Neuzeit S’s roundness, spareness, possession of eccentricity, and generous spacing is as much of a unifier as I required. Reading about our sans companion today, I found out that the S stands for Siemens, the original client for whom the face was made. Should you require more than two weights of Roman, Akira Kobayashi completed and re-released a set of optically corrected obliques in the Neuzeit Office set. A Rounded variant also exists.
Berling-Nova-and-Neuzeit-S-3 Berling-Nova-and-Neuzeit-S-4
Together the two slip tightly into dominant and subservient roles, or mesh as well-fit, well-oiled gears.
Berling-Nova-and-Neuzeit-S-5

Great Pairs continues here Wednesday.

New Fonts This Week

New Foundry Stereotypes
Elsa by Stereotypes
Sergio by FONTYOU
Flenja by Stereotypes
Secca Soft by Astype
Florence by Stereotypes

Dylan Copperplate by Wiescher

Prism by Stereotypes

Caboom by Wiescher

Sarre by Stereotypes
Bodoni Classic Fleurs by Wiescher
St Atmos by Stereotypes
Bodoni Classic Fleurs by Wiescher
St Friska by Stereotypes
Bodoni Classic Fleurs by Wiescher
St Lorie by Stereotypes
Bodoni Classic Fleurs by Wiescher
St Marie by Stereotypes
Bodoni Classic Fleurs by Wiescher
St Mika by Stereotypes
Bodoni Classic Fleurs by Wiescher
St Ryde by Stereotypes
Bodoni Classic Fleurs by Wiescher
St Transmission by Stereotypes
Bodoni Classic Fleurs by Wiescher

Continuing Promotions

All Laski Slab in Web and OT by ReType – 30% off until 7 May

Business Penmanship by Sudtipos – 30% off until 22 May

Consuelo by Latinotype50% off until 28 May

Karol Sans by Type-Ø-Tones20% off until 31 May

Jugo Script by Sudtipos30% off until 6 Jun


Want detailed showing of new fonts straight to your inbox? Make sure you’re receiving them in your inbox. They maybe getting lost in the promotions section. If you use Gmail then you can drag and drop the FontShop Newsletter from your Promotions Tab to your Primary Tab.

Buyer’s Guide: New Filters on the Free Fonts Page

We’ve updated our Free Fonts page to include format filters. Now you can filter for OpenType, TrueType, or Web. Yes, we have free webfonts!

The filter buttons are located just above the sample text bar.

freeefonts

Excited to explore the free fonts FontShop has to offer? Stay tuned to the blog to hear about our new Category page in next week’s Buyer’s Guide.

Pinterested: Fonts a Mother Would Love

 

Pinterested: Mother's Day

It’s that time of year again where we show our appreciation for that special lady in our lives.

On May 11th, amaze your mom with a one-of-a-kind card! We’ve picked out a few perfect fonts for you and some fStop images on our Mother’s Day inspired Pinterest board. And don’t forget a box of chocolates or a bouquet of roses to for that added touch!

Happy Mother’s Day!

Laski Slab and Graphie

Today we look at a fun and casual relationship between Paula Mastrangelo’s Laski Slab (made with the production help of Ramiro Espinoza) and Ryoichi Tsunekawa’s Graphie.

Laski-Slab-and-Graphie-1 Laski-Slab-and-Graphie-1a

Laski Slab was initially created for an online children’s magazine. Though spare, its inviting qualities are evident in the carriage of its bowls, the interplay of round and square contours, and small details such as its terminal treatments. Graphie does well as a complement to Laski Slab with its strong, wide dominance, ultra low contrast, and subtle mischief. Note the terminal angles of characters such as lowercase e and s. Such sign-painterly cues seem to be coming back into style forcefully this year. Together, the two create the kind of tension that holds well the reader’s consideration.

Laski-Slab-and-Graphie-2 Laski-Slab-and-Graphie-3 Laski-Slab-and-Graphie-4

That’s it. Great Pairs continues here Wednesday.

New Fonts This Week

New Fonts

Consuelo by Latinotype
Consuelo by Latinotype

Jugo Script by Sudtipos
Jugo Script by Sudtipos

Rumpus Room Filled by Sideshow
Rumpus Room Filled by Sideshow


Continuing Promotions

Nitti Grotesk by Bold Monday – 30% off until 30 April

P22 Wedge by IHOF – 25% off until 30 April

Bodoni Classic Fleurs by Wiescher – 50% until May 1st

Caboom by Wiescher – 50% until May 1st

Dylan Copperplate by Wiescher – 50% until May 1st

Marianina FY by FONTYOU – 80% off until 4 May

Coco FY and Chelly FY by FONTYOU – 50% off until 4 May

Exquise FY, Kaili FY, Bruum FY by FONTYOU – 70% off until 4 May

All Laski Slab in Web and OT by ReType – 30% off until 7 May

Business Penmanship by Sudtipos – 30% off until 22 May

Consuelo by Latinotype – 50% off all products until May 28th

Jugo Script in OT and Web by Sudtipos – 30% off until June 6th.


Want detailed showing of new fonts straight to your inbox? Make sure you’re receiving them in your inbox. They maybe getting lost in the promotions section. If you use Gmail then you can drag and drop the FontShop Newsletter from your Promotions Tab to your Primary Tab.

Buyer’s Guide: Comicraft EULA

COM

Founded by Richard Starkings and John Roshell in 1992, Comicraft is credited with pioneering digital lettering in the comic book industry. With studio clients that include Dark Horse Comics, DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Image Comics, Mad Magazine, Nickelodeon, Graphitti Designs, View Askew, Scholastic, Todd Mcfarlane Productions and NBC, and lettering and design work over the last 20 years they have won many awards including the coveted Eisner. So if you are looking for that authentic comic book look, then you’ve found your perfect foundry. Check out Flame On, Onomatopedia, and Destroyer on FontShop.

Basic EULA Rights

  • Desktop use supports up 5 CPUs and 1 output device.

Restrictions

  • You cannot share the font with users that do not have a license for the same font.
  • You cannot embed the font software into a Website or Application.

See Comicraft EULA

If you have additional questions you can always email FontShop’s Support Team for help.

EULA highlights will be posted every other Monday. Next up is Gestalten.

FontShop Friday Five: Defaults and Great Pairs

friday_five_20110429

 

We know you’re busy and the Internet is a crowded place, so we’ll try to give you a little reminder on Fridays of what’s going on out there. Below please find five recent FontShop-related threads that you may have missed.

New Fonts

We have a great assortment of new fonts this week from FONTYOU, Wiescher and Astype. Also, a bunch of continuing promotions!

Buyers Guide

Theresa takes us through the rights and restrictions of the Red Rooster EULA.

Welcome back, Great Pairs!

We’ve all been eagerly waiting for it! David is back with a new installment of Great Pairs. This week he covers  William Addison Dwiggins’s New Caledonia (digitized by Alex Kaczun), and Nick Shinn’s Brown Gothic.

FontFeed

Yves discussed the arrival of typography at TEDtalks on the FontFeed earlier this week.  See Matthew Carter  speak on “My Life in Typefaces”.

Defaults in Design

A new issue of Using Type is here! David reflects on Sibylle Hagmann‘s talk at TYPO San Francisco and introduces defaults which will be covered in several future installments. Check back for the continuation next week!

Defaults in Design

Starting the series back up on the subject of defaults, I spent some time thinking about how the limits imposed on the work we do ultimately influence our work’s form.

Using-Type-title---IMG_3024

Though we’re the designers, and we make the stuff look the way it does, a flip-through sampling of the pages of any advertising or design annual from the last fifty years will reveal its decade of origin—not by looking at the cover, or even the content, but just by examining the processes used. I say limits meaning both those we prescribe and the external constraints imposed by the job or environment. Sibylle Hagmann gave a great talk at TYPO San Francisco on advertising design in the GDR (Germany behind the Iron Curtain) where she pointed out that it was the great shortage of material related to typesetting and design production that led to the development of manual processes and a diversity of interesting and highly refined illustration and lettering styles.

IMG_7027-530x353Sibylle Hagmann speaking on Typography and Culture; Photo by Amber Gregory

 

Seeing how an entire subgenre of design grew out of a set of constraints further opened my eyes to the idea that the look and function of our work is largely a matter of the defaults we accept. And that learning to recognize the previously unconscious decisions we make both frees us and constrains us to use and invent new processes and to be aware of the effects of our choosing.

To introduce a more practical side to this discussion, I thought it would be interesting to look specifically at the defaults I accept, so, over the course of the next few weeks I’ll walk through some InDesign, Illustrator, and HTML/CSS defaults I find handy, as well as touch on some manual processes I go through when designing for screen and print.

That’s all. Thanks to Kent Lew’s Whitman Display for setting the title. Catch the first iteration on defaults here next Thursday. This is Using Type.

Rough: New Caledonia and Brown Gothic

Today we take a look at a pair of faces that together introduce a bit of additional texture to the compositions they create. William Addison Dwiggins’s New Caledonia (digitized by Alex Kaczun), and Nick Shinn’s Brown Gothic.

New-Caledonia-and-Brown-Gothic-1 New-Caledonia-and-Brown-Gothic-2
Looking closely at Brown Gothic, you’ll notice the subtle swelling of the strokes at each form’s ends and corners. This light distressing, as its designer calls it, serves both to mimic the impression of metal type—and thus hint at a specific period, and to unify and flavor the face’s overall color. New Caledonia offers a distinctive variation from the norm in terms of texture as well, but not by recreating digitally the effects of analog production. The design’s roughness instead comes from a careful variation of contrast, character gesture and proportion. Together the two fill in for each other and suggest very strongly the typographic texture common to American books and magazines of the 1950s and 60s.
New-Caledonia-and-Brown-Gothic-3 New-Caledonia-and-Brown-Gothic-4 New-Caledonia-and-Brown-Gothic-5That’s it. Great Pairs continues here each Wednesday.

New Fonts This Week

New Fonts
Dorum FY by FONTYOU

Dorum by FONTYOU

Sergio FY by FONTYOU
Sergio by FONTYOU
Secca Soft by Astype
Secca Soft by Astype
Dylan Copperplate by Wiescher

Dylan Copperplate by Wiescher

Caboom by Wiescher

Caboom by Wiescher

Bodoni Classic Fleurs by Wiescher
Bodoni Classic Fleurs by Wiescher

Continuing Promotions

Sofia Soft by Mostardesign Studio – 75% off until 23 of April

DIY Time by Latinotype – 75% off until 23 of April

Nitti Grotesk by Bold Monday – 30% off until 30 April

P22 Wedge by IHOF – 25% off until 30 April

Bodoni Classic Fleurs by Wiescher – 50% until May 1st

Caboom by Wiescher – 50% until May 1st

Dylan Copperplate by Wiescher – 50% until May 1st

Marianina FY by FONTYOU – 80% off until 4 May

Coco FY and Chelly FY by FONTYOU – 50% off until 4 May

Exquise FY, Kaili FY, Bruum FY by FONTYOU – 70% off until 4 May

All Laski Slab in Web and OT by ReType – 30% off until 7 May

Business Penmanship by Sudtipos – 30% off until 22 May


Want detailed showing of new fonts straight to your inbox? Make sure you’re receiving them in your inbox. They maybe getting lost in the promotions section. If you use Gmail then you can drag and drop the FontShop Newsletter from your Promotions Tab to your Primary Tab.

Buyer’s Guide: Red Rooster EULA

RR

With a collection that started in 1990, Steve Jackamen and his team of highly-skilled type designers, typographers and software experts have produced over 700 original and exclusive typefaces. Check out Kingsley, Relish, and Glasgow on FontShop.

Basic EULA Rights

  • Desktop use supports up 5 CPUs.
  • You can create a non-editable secured PDF for view and print only for non-commercial purposes.

Restrictions

  • You cannot share the font with users that do not have a license for the same font.
  • You cannot embed the font software into a Website or Application.
  • You cannot embed the font software into an ePub document.

See Red Rooster EULA

If you have additional questions you can always email FontShop’s Support Team for help.

EULA highlights will be posted every other Monday. Next up is Comicraft.

Pinterested: In Your Face: FF Mark

 

FF Mark

This week on Pinterest, we are highlighting our newest In Your Face board with FF Mark!

Designed with versatility in mind, it breaks tradition with its family of 10 weights ranging from Hairline to Black, with the extreme weights “engineered” to shine bright in large sizes and middle weights optimized for body copy.” You can see more FF Mark on FontFont‘s specially designed website.

New Fonts This Week

New Fonts
Pleasure Point by Comicraft

new_fonts_pleasure_point

Ferry Black by Letters from Sweden
new_fonts_ferry_black
Como by Flat-it Type Foundry

new_fonts_como

Compasse by Flat-it Type Foundry

new_fonts_compasse

Graphie by Flat-it Type Foundry

new_fonts_graphie

Kiro by Flat-it Type Foundry
new_fonts_kiro
Pero by Flat-it Type Foundry

new_fonts_Pero

Bookeyed Martin by Tart Workshop

new_fonts_bookeyed_martin

 

Arlt Lanzallamas by PampaType

new_fonts_arlt_lanzallamas

 



Continuing Promotions

Anglecia Complete Pro, Anglecia Display Pro, Anglecia Title Pro, Anglecia Text Pro by Mint Type80% off until 15 April

Courtesy Script Family by Sudtipos30% off until 20 April

Sofia Soft by Mostardesign Studio = 75% off until 23 of April

DIY Time by Latinotype = 75% off until 23 of April

Nitti Grotesk by Bold Monday30% off until 30 April

P22 Wedge by IHOF25% off until 30 April

Marianina FY by FONTYOU80% off until 4 May

Coco FY and Chelly FY by FONTYOU50% off until 4 May

Exquise FY, Kaili FY, Bruum FY by FONTYOU70% off until 4 May

All Laski Slab in Web and OT by ReType30% off until 7 May

Business Penmanship by Sudtipos30% off until 22 May


Want detailed showing of new fonts straight to your inbox? Make sure you’re receiving them in your inbox. They maybe getting lost in the promotions section. If you use Gmail then you can drag and drop the FontShop Newsletter from your Promotions Tab to your Primary Tab.
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