New Fonts This Week

New Fonts

Calavera by Cocijotype

calavera_cocijotype

Chicha by Cocijotype

chicha_cocijotype

Quincha by Cocijotype

quincha_cocijotype

Zipolite Rounded by Cocijotype

zipolite rounded_cocijotype

Adria Slab by Facetype

adria slab_facetype

Gauthier Display FY by FONTYOU

gauthier_display_fy_fontyou

Oscine by Dalton Maag

oscine_dalton maag

HWT Artz by Hamilton Wood Type

hwt artz_hamilton wood type

Abelina by Sudtipos

abelina_sudtipos


Continuing Promotions

Newslab Family by Latinotype – 75% off until 19 Jun

Adorn single weights by Laura Worthtington – 50% off until 19 Jun

Sherlock in OT and Web by Wiescher – 50% off until 19 Jun

Abdo Free by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Line by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Title by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Screen by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Logo by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Master by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Egypt by Abdo Fonts – 25% off until 2 July

Abdo Joody by Abdo Fonts – 25% off until 2 July

Abdo Misr by Abdo Fonts – 25% off until 2 July

Abdo Rajab by Abdo Fonts – 35% off until 2 July

Abdo Salem by Abdo Fonts – 35% off until 2 July

Pinto by FaceType – 50% off until 2 July

Archille FY by FONTYOU – 75% off  until 5 July

Booster FY by FONTYOU – 80% off  until 5 July

Brixton FY by FONTYOU – 70% off  until 5 July

Gauthier FY by FONTYOU – 50% off  until 5 July

Saya FY by FONTYOU – 70% off  until 5 July

Sperling FY by FONTYOU – 40% off  until 5 July

Suzee FY by FONTYOU – 40% off  until 5 July

Wes FY by FONTYOU – 40% off  until 5 July

Zitrone FY by FONTYOU – 50% off  until 5 July

Calavera Family by Cocijotype – 40% off until 15 July

Chicha by Cocijotype – 40% off until 15 July

Quincha by Cocijotype – 40% off until 15 July

Zipolite Rounded Family by Cocijotype – 40% off until 15 July

Adria Slab and Adria Slab Web by Facetype – 90% off until 15 July

Abelina Pro and Abelina Redux OT by Sudtipos – 30% off until 20 July

Gauthier Next FY by FONTYOU – 50% off until 24 July

Gauthier Display FY by FONTYOU – 40% off until 24 July

Brando by Bold Monday – 30% off until 15 Aug


Want detailed showing of new fonts straight to your inbox? Make sure you’re receiving them in your inbox. They maybe getting lost in the promotions section. If you use Gmail then you can drag and drop the FontShop Newsletter from your Promotions Tab to your Primary Tab.

Buyer’s Guide: Education Page

Need to brush up on your typography?

education-graphic

Visit FontShop’s Education page and download our PDFs created for students and designers. Even if you just need to brush up on terms or need tips, the Education page is a great resource to bookmark. It’s perfect to share within a classroom or studio.

Looking for more typographic knowledge? Check out Using Type where our Type Director, David Sudweeks, goes over best practices.

If you have additional questions you can always email FontShop’s Support Team for help.

Substrates

This is a continuation of the previous look at the typographer’s process at the beginning of a project, and we’ll end up talking about paper and other substrates.

Picture 1

A quick note on the creative brief before we proceed

Not only should the creative brief be clear about which objectives the project attempts to satisfy, it should articulate how it intends to do this as explicitly as possible. This second half of the brief is commonly overlooked or postponed in order to keep the process flexible. Make it explicit. Don’t let it just get rolled into the client approval process. My suggestion is to keep the brief updated and referred to regularly by both you and the client as the job progresses. That way, it serves as both a solid base and a structure from which the work can proceed, that adapts as necessary.

In the case of designing a set of concert tour materials, one example of an above adaptation may be to go from designing a single tour poster—to a small poster series done by studio collaborators. In the case of a publication, it may mean to transition from five 16-page daily broadsheets to a weekly-published 64-page tabloid.

Considerations the typographer is making at this point

As the brief solidifies, the job of the designer is to give the textual elements and their medium physical form. Even small projects pose big questions here, because of the seemingly endless possibilities and the constraints each imposes. In print design, getting the body copy working with the publication dimensions, adjusting each as one goes, and exploring substrates and the processes by which the piece is produced and bound is the first step toward putting real evidence behind this second part of the brief. With each serious paper option, run press checks and make a series of paper dummies to hold, heft, flip through, and examine how each feels.

What’s a substrate? Most commonly in print work, it’s paper. Substrate is a broad generic term for the underlying physical layer onto which one puts content. This includes all materials that carry the graphic information you apply to them, even physical pixels. And also in print there are a range of non-paper substrates used, each with its own limitations and peculiar processes for printing on or otherwise marking the sheet.

Paper and paper-like substrates

Paper, either hand-made or machine-made comes in a broad spectrum of weights, finishes, fiber content, colors, coatings, and specialized purposes. This is not to mention that there are fundamental differences in the ways that different classes of paper are produced. All laid, for example has a characteristic set of chain lines visible when held up to light. Most of the paper in use today is wove, which has a more or less uniform texture throughout. I could describe each category listed above in more detail, but I suggest instead a field trip to a paper supplier or well-stocked design studio, or that you order a range of samples for comparison. I do want to briefly focus on two important aspects of paper:

Basis Weight generally helps in determining the suitability of a paper stock to a given usage. It’s the paper’s density that the word ‘weight’ here is trying to describe. In the US, you need to pay close attention to whether it’s a cover weight or a text weight for the number to be remotely useful. It’s given in pounds, with the understanding that, for example, one ream of 40 pound text (40#t), weighs 40 pounds. You may be asking yourself, “Forty? Really? A ream is only 500 sheets. They must be huge sheets of paper.” You’d be right. For text grades, the sheet measured is 25 × 38 inches. Different grades are measured off of different standard sizes (and different quantities for what constitutes a ream). Without physically examining a given stock of paper from a manufacturer, it’s impossible to know what you’re getting. I really envy what the metric system has done elsewhere, with its no-nonsense paper density measured in grams per square meter.

Grain determines in which direction a sheet of paper naturally bends, and most successfully folds. To experience this, pick up any normal sheet of office paper. Put your hands together in front of you with palms facing up and place the paper on top. As you begin to close your palms together, as you would to fold the sheet in half, note the resistance the paper gives to being folded. Now open your hands, turn the sheet 90° and repeat the process. Feel that? One axis bends easily; the other is a bit stiffer. Put the paper back in front of you in the position where it bends easily, and raise your hands to eye level. You’re now looking along the grain. This means that the paper’s fibers lay primarily in the direction you’re now looking. When designing any printed piece with pages that a reader turns, this is the orientation the grain should be in—parallel with the spine. When ordering paper, the direction of the grain is marked either implicitly, 13 × 19, by the second number, or more explicitly, with an underline, 18 × 24. Knowing this stuff is especially important if the design requires folds.

You may be asking yourself at this point, “Didn’t this discussion leave the subject of typography a long way back?” Well, it turns out that the whole of type, the history of the forms themselves, their units of measurement, etc., are responses to the societal, economic, and technical constraints of the time, including for a long portion of its history, the means of printing and ranges of quality in paper. So, the consideration of the suitability of a given type family to a paper stock is one; and two, if the typographer’s expertise is to extend thus far in creating the feel of the book or other publication, should it not also consider how the pages move when turned?

Other substrates

Once you get started, there’s really no end. Wood, glass, metal, concrete, stone, porcelain, fabric, leather, even live animals are subject to branding. Each has its own processes.

We’ll pick up this discussion next week, and I’ll get a into inks and processes. That’s it for now. Using Type continues here Thursday. Thanks to Berton Hasebe’s Alda for setting the title.

Fonts You May Have Missed

Fonts You May Have Missed

Jugo Script by Sudtipos
Jugo Script by Sudtipos

Brando by Bold Monday
brando
Suzee FY by FONTYOU
Sergio by FONTYOU
Sherlock by Wiescher

Sherlock by Wiescher

Newslab by Latinotype

Newslab by Latinotype

 


Continuing Promotions

Proba Complete Pack by Mint Type – 80% off until 10 June

DSari by Latinotype – 75% off until 12 Jun

Carmen SW and Pack by Typerepublic – 75% off until 15 Jun

Newslab Family by Latinotype – 75% off until 19 Jun

Adorn single weights by Laura Worthtington – 50% off until 19 Jun

Sherlock in OT and Web by Wiescher – 50% off until 19 Jun

Abdo Free by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Line by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Title by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Screen by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Logo by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Master by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Egypt by Abdo Fonts – 25% off until 2 July

Abdo Joody by Abdo Fonts – 25% off until 2 July

Abdo Misr by Abdo Fonts – 25% off until 2 July

Abdo Rajab by Abdo Fonts – 35% off until 2 July

Abdo Salem by Abdo Fonts – 35% off until 2 July

Pinto by FaceType – 50% off until 2 July

Archille FY by FONTYOU – 75% off  until 5 July

Booster FY by FONTYOU – 80% off  until 5 July

Brixton FY by FONTYOU – 70% off  until 5 July

Gauthier FY by FONTYOU – 50% off  until 5 July

Saya FY by FONTYOU – 70% off  until 5 July

Sperling FY by FONTYOU – 40% off  until 5 July

Suzee FY by FONTYOU – 40% off  until 5 July

Wes FY by FONTYOU – 40% off  until 5 July

Zitrone FY by FONTYOU – 50% off  until 5 July

Brando by Bold Monday – 30% off until 15 Aug


Want detailed showing of new fonts straight to your inbox? Make sure you’re receiving them in your inbox. They maybe getting lost in the promotions section. If you use Gmail then you can drag and drop the FontShop Newsletter from your Promotions Tab to your Primary Tab.

Buyer’s Guide: Webfont License Overview

Confused about webfont licenses? Here are our top five Buyer’s Guides to common questions about webfonts on FontShop.

1. Self-Hosted vs. Hosted
Learn the difference between the two types of webfont hosting.

2. How webfonts are licensed. 
Discover who should be licensed and how.

3. What formats are webfonts available in? 
With @font-face you can use various formats, but your license may only cover specific ones.

4. Can all webfonts sold on FontShop be linked to Typekit? 
Tips on how to recognize webfonts that can be brought into a Typekit account.

5. Can I install EOT or WOFF on my computer? 
Find out if you need a desktop license too!

As a bonus, check out out our education page where you can find tips on how to use type in print and on the web.

If you have additional questions you can always email FontShop’s Support Team for help.

FontShop Friday Five: Birthday Bash

friday-five_20140520a

We know you’re busy and the Internet is a crowded place, so we’ll try to give you a little reminder on Fridays of what’s going on out there. Below please find five recent FontShop-related threads that you may have missed.

Antithesis

Even though Yanone’s Antithesis and accompanying video was released over a week ago, we still can’t get enough of it! Yves Peters gives a great summary of the 10 minute dance video and new typeface created by Yanone on the FontFeed. Check it out, we highly recommend it!

SF Design Week/Happy Birthday FontShop!

FontShop turns 25 this year and we are throwing a birthday bash during the San Francisco Design Week! On June 18th, we will open our doors during the free studio tours from 7-8pm where we will “talk type”, make some crafts, and enjoy some delicious cake!

New Fonts

We welcome new foundry lettersoup and announce several new designs from Facetype, Typolar and FONTYOU. Plus a new batch of promotions from Abdo fonts and FONTYOU.

Get Pinning!

If you’re like us, you’re always in search for new ideas and inspiration. That’s where Pinterest comes in! From character studies to huggable fonts, we continue to create boards for all your typography needs.

Gestalten Buyer’s Guide

Know the EULA rights and restrictions in this week’s Buyer’s Guide which focuses on foundry Gestalten.

 

 

 

Friday Five fonts: Adorn Serif Slab and Adorn Condensed Sans by Laura Worthington

San Francisco Design Week: Studio Tours & Birthday Celebration!

openstudio

It’s our 25th birthday and we would like to invite you to celebrate with us during the San Francisco Design Week this June 13-20. We are proud to be the typography sponsor of this fantastic event and will be opening our doors to you during day 2 of the Studio Tours on June 18th from 7-8pm at our San Francisco office.

Come “talk type”, check out our work space and help us blow out the birthday candles. Plus we’ll have some fun crafts and you’ll be able to stuff your face with some delicious cake and beer! Just maybe not at the same time.

Make sure to sign up for the free registration to attend the studio tours.

New Fonts This Week

New Foundry

Ropa Sans by lettersoup

ropa_sans_lettersoup

New Fonts

Pinto by FaceType

pinto_family_facetype

Gauthier Next FY by FONTYOU

gauthier_next_fy_fontyou

Walmer Marker by Typolar

walmer_marker_typolar


Continuing Promotions

Jugo Script by Sudtipos30% off until 6 Jun

Proba Complete Pack by Mint Type80% off until 10 June

DSari by Latinotype75% off until 12 Jun

Carmen SW and Pack by Typerepublic75% off until 15 Jun

Newslab Family by Latinotype75% off until 19 Jun

Adorn single weights by Laura Worthtington50% off until 19 Jun

Sherlock in OT and Web by Wiescher50% off until 19 Jun

Abdo Free by Abdo Fonts15% off until 2 July

Abdo Line by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Title by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Screen by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Logo by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Master by Abdo Fonts – 15% off until 2 July

Abdo Egypt by Abdo Fonts – 25% off until 2 July

Abdo Joody by Abdo Fonts – 25% off until 2 July

Abdo Misr by Abdo Fonts – 25% off until 2 July

Abdo Rajab by Abdo Fonts – 35% off until 2 July

Abdo Salem by Abdo Fonts – 35% off until 2 July

Pinto by FaceType – 50% off until 2 July

Archille FY by FONTYOU – 75% off  until 5 July

Booster FY by FONTYOU – 80% off  until 5 July

Brixton FY by FONTYOU – 70% off  until 5 July

Gauthier FY by FONTYOU – 50% off  until 5 July

Saya FY by FONTYOU – 70% off  until 5 July

Sperling FY by FONTYOU – 40% off  until 5 July

Suzee FY by FONTYOU – 40% off  until 5 July

Wes FY by FONTYOU – 40% off  until 5 July

Zitrone FY by FONTYOU 50% off  until 5 July

Gauthier Next FY by FONTYOU 50% off  until 5 July

Brando by Bold Monday30% off until 15 Aug


Want detailed showing of new fonts straight to your inbox? Make sure you’re receiving them in your inbox. They maybe getting lost in the promotions section. If you use Gmail then you can drag and drop the FontShop Newsletter from your Promotions Tab to your Primary Tab.

Buyer’s Guide: Gestalten EULA

DG

Known for groundbreaking publications in design, Gestalten specializes in developing content for aficionados of cutting-edge visual culture worldwide. With fonts that are designed partially for their own publications, the collection offers a variety of typeface for text, display, and experimental fonts. Check out T-Star, Blender, and Sensaway on FontShop.

Basic EULA Rights

  • Desktop use supports up 5 devices.

Restrictions

  • You cannot share the font with users that do not have a license for the same font.
  • You cannot embed the font software into a Website or Application.

See Gestalten

If you have additional questions you can always email FontShop’s Support Team for help.

EULA highlights will be posted every other Monday. Next up is Process Type Foundry.

Pinterested: I do, I do, I do!

Pinterested

June is rapidly approaching and that means it will be wedding season! We have compiled and updated a fantastic Pinterest board to inspire your perfect day. See all of the great examples of wedding design here!

The Typographer’s Approach to Typography

On the subject of getting into the head of the typographer, today we’ll walk through some decisions that graphic designers and typographers consider early on in the design process. Frankly, I hope this is useful stuff. Often while tracing the unconscious and intuitively made steps toward a given result, the final piece seems only obvious. Discussing these principles in the abstract and keeping my audience engaged long enough to hear it is the challenge I’ve accepted here.

Typographers-approach-to-typography-1

First, some terms

I know I’ve mentioned this here before, but just for clarity’s sake: Typography is “writing with prefabricated characters.” (Gerrit Noordzij said that.) A type designer is someone who makes type, those prefabricated characters just mentioned. A typographer is someone who specializes in using type. Lastly, though it’s a related field, lettering is not type, and the use of lettering is not typography. Ready to get started? Great.

What is the need?

With client work, a sizeable part of the design process goes into properly forming not the answer, but the question to which the design brief responds. It’s often in the process of conducting proper research that certain strong concepts present themselves. If it’s a publisher seeking a book or book cover design, it’s in the text. If it’s a fashion label refresh, it’s in the cut of the clothes, the demographic data, the histories of its designers. If it’s product packaging, or a music tour, or a cryptocurrency, or a playbill redesign, or a geotagging app, a movie prop, something in the research of the thing, its history, or the people who make it will show up as a distinct piece of the solution. From the beginning of this process, I keep a dedicated book to draw and write down my ideas.

The answer to the brief

Working out what rough forms the project will take given its requirements and constraints, I get to work figuring out what content needs to be created, who best to do it, and what kind of meaning the typography should give to the copy it sets. Special attention is placed on the visual requirements: How do specific marks translate from one medium to the next? How will they perform at large and small sizes? On the store shelves and in the lower third of the morning talk shows? Which typefaces and treatments have the handpicked quality required? Which typefaces will deliver consistent results on screen and in other physical applications? Linguistic requirements: How many languages will this piece be translated into, and is the layout I’ve created flexible enough to function well in the common cases? Adaptable to extreme cases? It’s also during this phase that I consider incorporating substrates and other materials, disciplines, and processes that make sense.

Pause. We’ll hold it here for now. I’ll continue when Using Type picks back up on Thursday. Please let me know if you find this interesting. Thanks to Frank Grießhammer’s FF Quixo for setting the title.

Buyer’s Guide: Webfont formats on FontShop

Webfont

 

Webfonts on FontShop are available in EOT and WOFF format for self-hosting. Not all foundries have webfonts, but products that do will have a webfont icon. SVG and TTF formats are not supplied.

If you have additional questions you can always email FontShop’s Support Team for help.

FontShop Friday Five: Try It Out!

fridayfive-025

We know you’re busy and the Internet is a crowded place, so we’ll try to give you a little reminder on Fridays of what’s going on out there. Below please find five recent FontShop-related threads that you may have missed.

 

Let’s Have Some Fun

Time to have some fun while playing with the new Tryout feature on next.fontshop.com! It’s only a beta version, but you already can do much more than test-drive webfonts in real time. You can also create whole layouts and collaborate freely with anyone on your artwork.
Currently, this feature only works with fonts that are available in webfont format.

Buyer’s Guide

Self-Hosted and Hosted webfonts?! Theresa explains the difference between Self-Hosted webfonts from Fontshop and Hosted webfonts from service providers on this week’s Buyer’s Guide.

Great Pairs

In his most recent edition of Great Pairs, David elaborates on David Quay’s Kade together with Joshua Darden’s Freight Micro. Also, you can play around with his type samples on the new Tryout feature!

New Fonts

Several new fonts this week from Laura Worthington, Wiescher and Emigre!

New Filters

We’ve made browsing fonts much easier with the new filters on our Free Fonts page!

Friday Five Fonts: Kozmetica Script by Sudtipos and Quatro Ultra Slab by psType

Web Typography: HTML Defaults

Just a quick tip on web typography, since I’m not a practicing HTML man, and I don’t pretend to be.

Screen Shot 2014-05-23 at 3.42.07 PM

Turn kerning and standard ligatures on by default

HTML-Defaults-IMG_2957

When Elliot Jay Stocks came to TYPO San Francisco to talk about the current state of advanced web typography, he ran through a number of changes between two years ago and now in terms of CSS. My main takeaway can be summed up by the above presentation slide, and the following implementation to cover as wide a range of browsers as possible. The current best way to enable kerning and ligatures is to affix these attributes to the page’s body:

text-rendering: optimizeLegibility;
-moz-font-feature-settings: "kern";
-moz-font-feature-settings: "kern=1";
-ms-font-feature-settings: "kern";
-o-font-feature-settings: "kern";
-webkit-font-feature-settings: "kern";
font-feature-settings: "kern";
-webkit-font-feature-settings: "liga" 1;
-o-font-feature-settings: "liga" 1;
-moz-font-feature-settings: "liga" 1;
-moz-font-feature-settings: "liga=1";
-ms-font-feature-settings: "liga" 1;
font-feature-settings: "liga" 1;

The rest of the things that could be considered defaults, such as a paragraph’s line length, or hyphenation, etc., I recommend baking into your design after you’ve considered the conditions under which it may be viewed. While reviewing defaults, it may be a good time to also check to make sure any webfonts used have their styles properly set up.

A note on the value of global resets

I see these becoming less and less relevant. It feels like an over-controlling attitude to take with such a fluid medium, specifying every single element, and then resetting the browser defaults for each to zero, none, etc.. I’m more of the attitude of targeting a specific range of browsers, and then addressing problems as they arise. I’m sure there are reasons why I’m wrong. Please let me have them. Plus, there must be a lot of obvious stuff I’m missing here.

That’s it; and this concludes my series on defaults. Next week, I’ll try to get a better view of typography from inside the typographer’s brain. Using Type continues here Thursday. Thanks to Nick Shinn’s Brown Gothic for setting today’s title.

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