Monthly Archives: November 2013

Pinterested: We’ve Got Fonts, Yes We Do!

Pinterested: We've Got Fonts, Yes We Do!

1, 2, 3, 4, who are we rooting for?! Fonts!

Check out the  We’ve Got Fonts, Yes We Do! board to cheer for your favorite typeface and fStop images.

Ornaments

Here at the end of the year, we’re starting something new. Through the holidays, counting up to January 1, Yves Peters and I will be decorating this blog with ornaments – one per day. The good stuff, often tucked away at the bottom of the glyph palette, ornamental glyphs constitute an interesting area where type designers can play and experiment with contrasting typographic texture, where type can easily decouple from its associated meaning and serve as pure form.

The series will span faces that introduce a little something extra, say, a single fleuron or border set, to faces entirely decorative in nature. And we’ll also take on the symbolic ‘also functional’ category, dingbats, which we find underutilized and ripe graphic / textural material. (We’ll be taking a very inclusive approach to what one might consider ornaments.) That all starts Sunday. Until then, to the Americans and anyone else who observes it — Happy Thanksgiving. We’ll be closed over the holiday to spend time with our families.

Ornaments-0

The above sample is just a taste of the series, set in Jonathan Perez’s Cadence (background) and featuring a fleuron from Jim Parkinson’s redrawing of Dwiggins’s Electra.

The Ornament Series is produced collaboratively by David Sudweeks and Yves Peters.

New Fonts This Week

Pilcrow by Indian Type Foundry

pilcrow

Klaus FY by FONTYOU
Webfonts Available

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Serafine FY by FONTYOU
Webfonts Available

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HWT Van Lanen by Hamilton Wood Type
Webfonts Available

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HWT Gothic Round by Hamilton Wood Type
Webfonts Available

week47_hwt-gothic-round

VGT Stencil German No.1 by Astype

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Al Fresco by Laura Worthington
Webfonts Available

week47_al-fresco

Arabetics Harfi by Arabetics
Webfonts Available

Arabetics Harfi

Raqmi by Arabetics
Webfonts Available

Raqmi

Camille by Arabetics
Webfonts Available

Camille

Nagham by Arabetics
Webfonts Available

Nagham


Continuing Promotions

Blok, Scissorgirl, Ebu Script, and Surreal Post Indian by Type-Ø-Tones20% off until 30 November

Equip and Equip Condensed by Hoftype50% off until 2 December

Santis by Latinotype50% off until 4 December

Dulce Complete Pro by Latinotype50% off until 11 December

Festival Script by Sudtipos30% off until 15 December

Felicita by Wiescher50% off until 31 December

Seashore by Sudtipos30% off until 3 January

FONTYOU Promotion — until 12 December

30% off LeanO FY
50% off Maryleen FY, Beaurencourt FY, Booster FY, and Gauthier FY
70% off Achille FY, Younion FY, and Marianina FY

Abdo Fonts Promotion — until 4 December

15% off Abdo Free, Abdo Line, Abdo Title, Abdo Screen, and Abdo Logo
25% off Abdo Egypt and Abdo Joody
40% off Abdo Rajab and Abdo Salem

Buyer’s Guide: Typofonderie EULA

JEFounded in 1994 by Jean François Porchez, Typofonderie is an independent digital type foundry based in Clamart (France). Dedicated to high quality design, many Typofonderie typefaces have won prizes international competitions. Ambroise, Le Monde, and Parisine are examples of stellar fonts you can license from FontShop.

Here are some highlights from the EULA.

Basic EULA Rights

  • Desktop use supports up to 1 computer at a single geographic location.
  • You can embed fonts for production and internal use.

Restrictions

  • You cannot share the font with users that do not have a license for the same font.
  • You cannot embed the font into a Website or Application.
  • You cannot embed the font for Commercial Products or Digital Media.

See Typofonderie EULA

If you have additional questions you can always email FontShop’s Support Team for help.

EULA highlights will be posted every other Monday. Next up is G-Type.

Pinterested: Edible Type

Pinterested: Edible Type

Curb that hunger for type with our Edible Type board! It may even inspire you to get creative the next time you encounter a salt shaker.

Fine Print: Fonts for Small Sizes

Type designed specifically for use at small sizes attempts to solve the problem of too much to say in too little space. When conserving resources (ink, paper, etc.) comes at the cost of legibility, it’s best to plan your type palette around faces made to perform below conventional text sizes. How will you know which faces hold up small? Here are a few principles to consider:

Picture 1

Choose something generally robust.

Picture 3

The x-height should be relatively large. Counterforms need to be accentuated. Spacing should be pretty generous. And careful with fine lines—they tend to disappear. Notice above how ITC Bodoni Six differs from a larger optical size Bodoni Seventy Two. This brings up another point. Sometimes a font’s name includes a reference to its optical size, such as a number, or the terms agate, pearl, or micro. Any others come to mind?

Size-specific optical corrections

Picture 2

As if reproduction concerns weren’t enough on their own (managing inevitabilities such as ink spread and so forth), at small sizes your eyes tend to further distort the letterforms. For example, when strokes intersect, (especially at acute angles) the negative space closes up near the intersection. This is remedied by forcing white up into the crotches and joins by way of light wells or ink traps, as you can see above in Matthew Carter’s Bell Centennial. Other phenomena, such as the flattening and squaring off of curves are counteracted by enlarging the gestures of each form. These are easy to compare in faces that have a range of optical sizes. Without, it just takes testing and practice recognizing what works and why. To get you started in the right direction, here’s a FontList of type that works at small sizes curated by a friend and fellow typographer, Nick Sherman.

Picture 4

Take these principles into consideration and you’ll find they apply not only to print, but also to screen media that’s meant to be viewed from a distance. You may also find, as many have, that the unusual texture of faces designed for small print, such as  Joshua Darden’s Freight Micro above, can be quite appealing at larger sizes. That’s it. Using Type continues here Thursday. Thanks to Nick Shinn’s Scotch Modern for setting the opening title.

Le Monde Journal and Parisine

Today we pair a couple of Jean François Porchez’s masterfully understated faces, Le Monde Journal and Parisine.

Le-Monde-Journal-and-Parisine-1 Le-Monde-Journal-and-Parisine-2

From Le Monde Journal emanates a certain strength, mostly due to its forceful rhythm and its forms’ careful balance between robust gestures and delicate details. The face is designed to set compactly both horizontally and vertically, with a narrow fit, a large x-height and modest extenders. It also comes in a range of tightly-stepped weights to accommodate various factors of scale and output. As a companion to Le Monde Journal, Parisine operates as a sophisticated humanist sans, adding a softer dimension to the pairing. Together the two create a versatile set that lends care and credibility to its message. Should you require something even more playful, see Parisine Plus.Le-Monde-Journal-and-Parisine-3 Le-Monde-Journal-and-Parisine-4 Le-Monde-Journal-and-Parisine-5

Great Pairs continues here Wednesday.

New Fonts This Week

FF Quixo by FontFont
Webfonts Available

week46_ffquixo

Family Extension – FF Profile Thin & Extra Light by FontFont
Webfonts Available
week46_ffprofile-thin-extralight
Albertan Pro by Canada Type

week46_albertan-pro

Isabelle Pro by Canada Type

week46_isabelle-pro

Lancelot Pro by Canada Type

week46_lancelot-pro

Lapis Pro by Canada Type

week46_lapis-pro

Loxley by Canada Type

week46_loxley

Mauritius by Canada Type

week46_mauritius

Bloket Pro by profonts
Webfonts Available

week46_bloket-pro

Baghadeer by Stephen Rapp Lettering Design

week46_baghadeer

Seashore Pro by Sudtipos

week46_seashore-pro

Labyrindo by URW
Webfonts Available

week46_labyrindo

Maccaroni by URW
Webfonts Available

week46_maccaroni

Sign Painters Script by URW
Webfonts Available

week46_sign-painters-script

Quendel by URW
Webfonts Available

week46_quendel

Seizième by URW
Webfonts Available

week46_seizieme

Felicita by Wiescher
Webfonts Available

week46_felicita


Continuing Promotions

Magallanes Condensed by Latinotype80% off until 20 November

Blok, Scissorgirl, Ebu Script, and Surreal Post Indian by Type-Ø-Tones20% off until 30 November

Equip and Equip Condensed by Hoftype50% off until 2 December

Santis by Latinotype50% off until 4 December

Dulce Complete Pro by Latinotype50% off until 11 December

Festival Script by Sudtipos30% off until 15 December

FONTYOU; Promotion — until 12 December

30% off LeanO FY
50% off Maryleen FY, Beaurencourt FY, Booster FY, and Gauthier FY
70% off Achille FY, Younion FY, and Marianina FY

Abdo Fonts Promotion — until 4 December

15% off Abdo Free, Abdo Line, Abdo Title, Abdo Screen, and Abdo Logo
25% off Abdo Egypt and Abdo Joody
40% off Abdo Rajab and Abdo Salem

Buyer’s Guide: James Todd Design EULA

JTDOriginally trained as a bespoke tailor, James Todd changed gears in 2009 and has been actively involved in graphic and type design. Occasionally working for P22 Type Foundry and Hamilton Wood Type Foundry, he has released his original fonts under the name of James Todd Design. Garvis, which is also available as a webfont, shows his attention to detail.

Here are some highlights from the EULA.

Basic EULA Rights

  • Desktop use supports up to 5 computer at a single geographic location.
  • You can create a secured non-editable PDF for non-commercial use.
  • You may provide the use of the fonts to a third party working on your behalf only if they use the font exclusively for your work, agree to all terms of license, and retain no copies of the font when the work is completed.

Restrictions

  • You cannot modify the font software without the express permission of the foundry.
  • You cannot embed the font into a Website or Application.

See James Todd Design EULA

If you have additional questions you can always email FontShop’s Support Team for help.

EULA highlights will be posted every other Monday. Next up is Typofonderie.

Pinterested: Great Pairs

Pinterested: Great Pairs

In need of a good pair?

Great Pairs by our Type Expert David Sudweeks, can be found every Wednesday on our blog. Here he’ll address the how’s and why’s of combining typefaces to help out with your typography needs.

Two Spaces After a Period—The Definitive Guide

When you’re typing, you may out of habit put in an extra space at the end of a sentence; That’s two spaces between the closing punctuation of one sentence and the beginning of the next. Or it may not be out of habit, but rather, on principle. Let’s talk about that principle.

Two-Spaces-2

Before common use of the space, early Latin writing ran in a continuous script, a stream of letters, line-breaking often in the middle of (what we call) a word. With the addition of spaces, and later, punctuation, words as we now know them developed, and along with them, sentences, grammar. As to the amount of space between sentences, that would vary by hand and circumstance until moveable type.

Screen Shot 2013-11-14 at 6.17.33 PMNicolas Jenson, Venice, 1475.

And after. You see, spaces come in a variety of standard sizes. The earliest works printed from moveable type were all set in justified columns, meaning that the width of each word space expanded or contracted slightly from the normal word space to fit different numbers of characters per line as needed. In these early samples, the amount of space between sentences ranged from quite wide, to slightly narrower than the space between words. The most obvious reason for using a narrower space here is to maintain an even typographic color, since the period traps quite a lot of negative space on its own. By the late 18th century, conventions favored more generous sentence spacing. My take from all this early letterpress stuff—counting the number of spaces after a period is as pointless in samples of early printing as it is in handwritten manuscripts. This holds up until of course, typewriters.

Two-Spaces-1Published by Anson D. F. Randolph, New York, 1864. The text is a Caslon.

With typewriters, we get three things—unjustified type, fixed-width typefaces, and typists. The first two pertain to our discussion because we can now count precisely the number of spaces after the period. The third, because our usual scheme of submitting something to be published just got another layer. The typewritten page became both an interim format and a final format for papers and books. Scholarly papers, for instance, were submitted as typewritten manuscripts which then did the rounds between editors, and on to typographers, and ultimately, typesetters. In contrast, for some publications, the typewritten page (or a copy of it) was the final. Whether two spaces after a period arose as a standard under the first typing instructors’ imitation of the printed page, or the practice began independently of what came before, is unclear. Ultimately however the question of how to compose the input should be settled by its output.

The common convention for published works today is a single space between sentences.

If you’re submitting your writing to be published, save the typographer the trouble of finding and removing all those additional spaces by not keying them in in the first place. If you’re producing final output on your own (writing for a blog, etc.) the same rule applies.

Unless

Keep putting two spaces in if:

  • You’re typing on a manual typewriter, or your final output will emulate the look of that of one.
  • If you’re specifically pursuing a naïve style.
  • If your style guide requires it.

This last one you should be careful to do begrudgingly, like I do when occasionally required to capitalize the word ‘Internet.’ Which arcane style guide requires two spaces after a period, you ask? APA Style does. MLA, Chicago, and AP have all questioned the usefulness of that second space and decided it’s best to go without.

And that’s it. Thanks for reading. Thanks also goes to Evert Bloemsma’s FF Legato for setting this week’s nameplate. Using Type continues here Thursday.

FF Yoga and FF Sero

Today we look at Xavier Dupré’s FF Yoga and Jörg Hemker FF Sero.

FF-Yoga-and-FF-Sero-1 FF-Yoga-and-FF-Sero-2

FF Sero’s understated humanized gothic, fully capable of text setting on its own, puts the emphasis on FF Yoga’s statelier qualities. Together the two create a warm, firm, yet flexible feel, suitable for contemporary work. If FF Yoga looks familiar, it’s because the face is heavily influenced by Eric Gill’s Joanna, but not without a fresh take all its own.FF-Yoga-and-FF-Sero-3 FF-Yoga-and-FF-Sero-4 FF-Yoga-and-FF-Sero-5

Great Pairs continues here Wednesday.

New Fonts This Week

New Foundry LIEBEFONTS
LiebeRuth
Webfonts Available

week45_lieberuth

LiebeErika
Webfonts Available

week45_liebeerika

LiebeChristmas
Webfonts Available

week45_libechristmas

LiebeCook
Webfonts Available

week45_libecook

Bree Serif by TypeTogether

week45_bree_serif

Dulce Complete Pro by Latinotype

week45_dulce

Filmotype Leader by Filmotype

week45_filmotype-leader

Mister Brown by Sideshow

week45_mister-brown


Continuing Promotions

In a Jar by Latinotype $39 until 13 November

Magallanes Condensed by Latinotype80% off until 20 November

Blok, Scissorgirl, Ebu Script, and Surreal Post Indian by Type-Ø-Tones20% off until 30 November

Equip and Equip Condensed by Hoftype50% off until 2 December

Santis by Latinotype  — 50% off until 4 December

Festival Script by Sudtipos30% off until 15 December

Abdo Fonts Promotion — until 4 December

15% off Abdo Free, Abdo Line, Abdo Title, Abdo Screen, and Abdo Logo
25% off Abdo Egypt and Abdo Joody
40% off Abdo Rajab and Abdo Salem

Buyer’s Guide: Three Islands Press EULA

TIPThree Island Press is best know for its antique penmanship fonts molded after 18th and 19th century handwriting of actual people. Take a look at 3IP Historial Collection on FontShop and you can see the authenticity that the typefaces evoke.

Here are some highlights from their EULA.

Basic EULA Rights

  • Desktop use supports up to 5 computer at a single geographic location.
  • You can create a secured non-editable PDF for non-commercial use.

Restrictions

  • You cannot modify the font software without the express permission of the foundry.
  • You cannot embed the font into a Website or Application.

See Three Island Press EULA

If you have additional questions you can always email FontShop’s Support Team for help.

EULA highlights will be posted every other Monday. Next up is James Todd Design.

Pinterested: New & Noteworthy

Pinterested: New & Note

Want to catch up on new arrivals? Check out our New & Noteworthy board for all promos and new fonts released every Tuesday!

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