Which of these couples is your favorite great pair?

Four couples were sweet enough to tell us their “great pairs” story for Wedding Month. Instead of whittling down our favorites we leave it up our readers to select who deserves $100 on FontShop toward a “font registry” selected by Type Expert David Sudweeks.

Read their stories and then vote below.
great_pairs

Jen & Chris

Some people say opposites attract, and I would dare to say that these differences are what make us fit… Chris & I met a long time ago when we were teenagers, running in the same circles… We didn’t like each other at all. He thought I was pretentious and I thought he was a loser… When our lines crossed years later, it was those differences that we found interesting, and that keep our relationship amazing. We listen to different music, like different movies – I like art movies, and he likes Die Hard, I like heavy metal, he prefers alt country. He’s 6’1″, and I’m 5’4″. I cook, he eats. I break things, he fixes them. We have different friends, and different hobbies.He is always trackside at all my roller derby matches, and I am always front row centre at every concert he plays, and when we meet in the middle, we always have something to say.

Angela’s Story

My fiance and I are a perfect fit because our opposites and similarities mesh perfectly like butter oozing into the crispy compartments of an Eggo waffle. He’s an analytic and straight-thinker, and I’m an abstract-thinking artist. He can crunch numbers in his sleep, and I’m still trying to figure out what numbers are. He likes the middle chewy brownies, and I prefer the crispy edge pieces. Our common loves of photography, traveling and cooking brought us together, but our complementary differences are what keep our relationship thriving. While we still have spirited debates over whether or not the ketchup should be kept in the refrigerator and whether the toilet paper should be situated end out or down, our differences keep things interesting and keep us on our toes.

Ruben’s Story

We would seldom pair two serifs together. And with good reason: when pairing, we want to get the most out of playing two different tones, and two seriffed typefaces can easily convey the same tone. We want harmony; a chord. We want rhythm, which cannot be had with just one continuous tone or with just pure silence. Good cop, bad cop (irrelevant cops). We want to say different things differently. And also, we want the equivalent of our parent of the opposite sex so we can play our parent of the same sex, which is what we learned while growing up.
So this is obviously not about me and my girlfriend, nor is it about music or typography: it’s clearly about the Universe.
You see, there is yin and yang. There is light and darkness. If everything was darkness, the Universe would be featureless. Likewise if everything was light. How could you point out something to me if there were no boundaries? Well, you and I wouldn’t exist, so there’s that.
My girlfriend and I would also certainly not exist. Because everything about us is really just about boundaries. Boundaries we create for ourselves whose limitations and faults we constantly see in the other. Boundaries which we would feel no need to cross, except if we wanted to touch and, in fact, become one with one another and thusly bring something new to the text.
We are two serifs. However, very different ones. We clash. We say two very different things using the same sentence.
Sometimes we might feel harmonious. Other times we are dissonant. Sometimes we synchronise frequencies for a brief second and amplify each other’s tone, resonating, only to then gradually grow further apart and make the difference become naturally self-evident. That’s because while my spacing is loose, my shapes are tight; my colour is uneven, but I pull her along with those deftly (or not) positioned and counter-balanced spots of lightness and darkness. And while her shapes are loose, she is tightly kerned; her colour is consistently composed, which does make for a better looking block of text and is a lot less distracting and more constant.
And when we least expect it, I am somehow her, and she is somehow me. We switch tones.
And that’s how you pair two serifs together: let them be very different; but just put them together long enough, with strong enough conviction (and some experimentation), and you will eventually find that the fact that they’re both serifs can only hold them together. It’s not that they have different serifs; it’s that they both have them that matters most.

Katie & Jerry

Jerry and I met in college while on a trip with mutual friends to an ice skating rink. By the end of our first night I knew that he was an accomplished figure skater (hot!), that he loved Bill Nye the Science Guy, and that I was completely smitten. It took me a while to convince him that we were perfect for each other…I had a head of bright pink hair, he definitely did not; he was a gamer, I was not; he was the pickiest eater I had ever met (the only fruit he ate was apples, his diet consisted of plain pasta, rice, chicken, and Goldfish crackers), I was kind of horrified that my usual method of wooing (lots, and lots of food) was just not going to work. But here we are, almost 5 years later. I’ve become a gamer, he eats like a human, and no one has pink hair. I cannot imagine my life without him. Somehow, together we equal more than the sum of our parts, and our differences balance us. We’re getting married 10/4/14 (10+4=14! nerds!) and would like to find typefaces that are as great together as we are.

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